Showing 222 results

names

Iona Community

  • C0029
  • Corporate body
  • 1938 - present

The Iona Community was founded in Glasgow and Iona in 1938 by George MacLeod, minister, visionary and prophetic witness for peace, in the context of the poverty and despair of the Depression. From a dockland parish in Govan, Glasgow, he took unemployed skilled craftsmen and young trainee clergy to Iona to rebuild both the monastic quarters of the medieval abbey and the common life by working and living together, sharing skills and effort as well as joys and achievement. That original task became a sign of hopeful rebuilding of community in Scotland and beyond. The experience shaped – and continues to shape – the practice and principles of the Iona Community.

Justice and Peace Scotland

  • C0073
  • Corporate body
  • 1979 - present

The Scottish Catholic Justice and Peace Commission was formed in 1979. It is the Scottish Commission of the Pontifical Council Justitia et Pax.

It functions as the Bishops' advisory body on issues of social justice, international peace and human rights with the responsibility for networking existing newly formed local parish groups.

The constituency of Justice and Peace is over a thousand people out of an active Catholic population in Scotland of about 225,000.

Each of Scotland's eight dioceses is entitled to send an official representative to the National Commission. Also represented are the religious, missionary and secular clergy; youth and ecumenical representatives; and SCIAF – the Scottish Catholic International Aid Fund, their sister agency.

Kelly | Pat | |trade unionist

  • P0018
  • Person

Kelly was an ardent trade unionist, rising to become president of the Scottish Trade Union Congress. He was involved with the work of the SC AAM, sitting on the board of director for Sechaba Festivals Ltd during 1990.

Labour Party

  • C0013
  • Corporate body
  • 1900 - present

The Labour Party emerged in 1900 as a parliamentary pressure group. They established the National Health Service and created and maintained the empowering welfare state. Equally important has been the development of Labour as a mass membership party in the 1920s and 1930s, the modernisation of our campaigning techniques in the 1980s and the election of 101 Labour women MPs in 1997.

Liason Committee of the Anti-Apartheid Movements of the European Community

  • C0079
  • Corporate body
  • 1972-1995

The Liaison Group of Anti-Apartheid Movements in the European Community was formed in 1988 to lobby the European Parliament and Council of Ministers. In April 1995 it reformed as the European Network for Information and Action on Southern Africa to promote partnership between South Africa and the European Union.

Louw |Marah |b.1957 |singer

  • P0019
  • Person
  • b. 1957

Louw is a South African singer and actress. Her singing has taken her all over the world. She sang at the ceremony that presented Nelson Mandela with the Freedom of the Nine Cities in Glasgow, 1993. Later returning to tour the UK in 1994 to raise money for the ANC's election campaign. She went on to sing at Mandela's inauguration and at the Freedom Day Celebrations in 1994.

MacKirdy, Mary | 1874–1957 | Principal of the West End School of Cookery, Glasgow

  • P0067
  • Person
  • 1874–1957

Mary MacKirdy, was the niece of Mrs Margaret Black, founder of the West End School of Cookery. She was born on the 11th May 1874 and achieved her diploma from the West End School in September 1894, with both the Scotch Education Department and the Glasgow School Board granting assessments for her training. She taught cookery at the West End School of Cookery from 1895, becoming its Principal on Margaret Black’s death in 1903.

When the West End School of Cookery amalgamated with the Glasgow School of Cookery in 1908, to form The Glasgow and West of Scotland College of Domestic Science, the Miss Ella Glaister became Principal, however Mary MacKirdy remained as part of the teaching staff. She was a head teacher in cookery, specialising in the Article 55 students, the Provincial Committee students who were supplementing their elementary teaching qualification. She kept abreast of the growing subject of Domestic Science, on the whole, and gave well attended public lectures and worked with Ministry of Labour classes. She was a published writer of articles and books on cookery including the College publication "Recipes for You".

Her younger sister Miss Janet MacKirdy was also on the teaching staff and they both shared a house, first at 191 Renfrew Street, then latterly at 9 Park Quadrant. In June and July of 1926 Mary was granted two months leave of absence to visit the United States and Canada, with a view to furthering her knowledge by visiting schools and colleges in these countries. Janet was also granted one months’ leave, June, to travel with her sister and her remit was labour saving and modern household devices.

Mary MacKirdy was made a Fellow of the Educational Institute of Scotlandin 1935. She resigned from the College on the 9th of September 1937, after 42 years of service. On leaving she wasthe longest serving member of staff. She went on to become a Nutrition Supervisor for the Community Service in Scotland at the age of 63 years. A College prize, in appreciation of her work and service was given in her name for Article 55 students. This was presented by Mrs Black, of Kirkcaldy, who had previously given the Mrs Margaret Black Memorial Prize in 1925. The prize was first presented in 1938.

Mary MacKirdy was very much involved with the Bridgeton's Women's Institution, holding the position of Convener, and devoting much of her time to settlement and club work in Bridgeton. When this organisation ceased to function a gift of £200 from it's remaining funds was gifted to the College in December 1950. This money was used for educational purposes in the field of social sciences and was known as the Bridgeton's Women's Institution Fund.

Mary MacKirdy died in 1957.

MacQuarrie| Stuart|b.1953|Anti-Apartheid activist

  • P0021
  • Person
  • b. 1953

MacQuarrie was a Labour Councillor who represented Glasgow City Council during the organisation of Mandela's visit to Glasgow in 1993 and was instrumental in the renaming of St George's Place to Nelson Mandela Place in 1986.

MacQuarrie has been Chaplin to Glasgow University since 2001.

Mandela, Winnie | b. 1936 | South African activist and politician

  • P0063
  • Person
  • b. 1936

Born Nomzamo Winifred Madikizela on September 26, 1936, in Bizana, a rural village in the Transkei district of South Africa, Winnie Mandela eventually moved to Johannesburg in 1953 to study at the Jan Hofmeyr School of Social Work. South Africa was under the system known as apartheid, where citizens of indigenous African descent were subjected to a harsh caste system in which European descendants enjoyed much higher levels of wealth, health and social freedom.

Winnie completed her studies and, though receiving a scholarship to study in America, decided instead to work as the first black medical social worker at Baragwanath Hospital in Johannesburg. A dedicated professional, she came to learn via her field work of the deplorable state that many of her patients lived in.

In the mid-1950s, Winnie met attorney Nelson Mandela, who, at the time, was leader of the African National Congress, an organization with the goal of ending South Africa's apartheid system of racial segregation. The two married in June 1958, despite concerns from Winnie's father over the couple's age difference and Mandela's steadfast political involvements. After the wedding, Winnie moved into Mandela's home in Soweto. She became legally known thereafter as Winnie Madikizela-Mandel.
Nelson Mandela was routinely arrested for his activities and targeted by the government during his early days of marriage. He was eventually sentenced in 1964 to life imprisonment, leaving Winnie Mandela to raise their two small daughters, Zenani and Zindzi, single-handedly. Nonetheless, Winnie vowed to continue working to end apartheid; she was involved surreptitiously with the ANC and sent her children to boarding school in Swaziland to offer them a more peaceful upbringing.

Monitored by the government, Winnie Mandela was arrested under the Suppression of Terrorism Act and spent more than a year in solitary confinement, where she was tortured. Upon her release, she continued her activism and was jailed several more times. Then after the Soweto 1976 uprisings where hundreds of students were killed, she was forced by the government to relocate to the border town of Brandfort in 1977 and placed under house arrest. She described the experience as alienating and heart-wrenching, yet she continued to speak out, as in a 1981 statement to the BBC on black South African economic might and its ability to overturn the system.

In 1985, after her home was firebombed, Winnie returned to Soweto and continued to agitate against the regime even during government media bans. Her actions continued to cement the title bestowed upon her, "Mother of the Nation." But Winnie also became known for endorsing deadly retaliation against black citizens who collaborated with the apartheid regime. Additionally, her group of bodyguards, the Mandela United Football Club, garnered a reputation for brutality. In 1989, a 14-year-old boy named Stompie Moeketsi was abducted by the club and later killed.

Through a complex mix of domestic political maneuvering and international outrage, Nelson Mandela was freed in 1990, after 27 years of imprisonment. The years of separation and tremendous social turmoil had irrevocably damaged the Mandela marriage, however, and the two separated in 1992. Before that, Winnie Mandela was convicted of kidnapping and assaulting Moeketsi; after an appeal, her six-year sentence was ultimately reduced to a fine.

Even with her conviction, Winnie Mandela was elected president of the ANC's Women's League. Then, in 1994, Nelson Mandela won the presidential election, becoming South Africa's first black president; Winnie was subsequently named deputy minister of arts, culture, science and technology. However, due to affiliations and rhetoric seen as highly radical, she was ousted from her cabinet post by her husband in 1995. The couple divorced in 1996, having spent few years together out of almost four decades of marriage.

Winnie Mandela appeared before the nation's Truth and Reconciliation Commission in 1997, and was found responsible for "gross violations of human rights" in connection to the killings and tortures implemented by her bodyguards. While ANC leaders kept their political distance, Winnie still retained a grassroots following. She was re-elected to Parliament in 1999, only to be convicted of economic fraud in 2003. She quickly resigned from her post, though her conviction was later overturned.

Winnie Mandela continues to be a controversial media figure. In a 2010 Evening Standard newspaper interview, she sharply criticized Archbishop Desmond Tutu and her ex-husband, disparaging Nelson Mandela's decision to accept the Nobel Peace Prize with former South African President F.W. de Klerk. Winnie later denied making the statements. In 2012, the British press published an email that Winnie Mandela had composed, in which she criticized the ANC for its general treatment of the Mandela clan.

After her husband, Nelson Mandela, was released from prison in 1990, Winnie Mandela shared in his political activities, despite her scandalous reputation. In 1993, Winnie became president of the African National Congress Women's League, and in 1994, she was elected to Parliament. She was re-elected to Parliament in 1999, but resigned in 2003, under a new financial scandal.

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