Showing 222 results

names

Scottish Asian Action Committee

  • C0064
  • Corporate body

Scottish Asian Action Committee is an umbrella organisation for a number of Asian organisations. It provides advice and information for ethnic minority communities on immigration, housing, social security and consumer problems. They campaign on issues such as racism and discrimination.

Scottish Catholic International Aid Fund

  • C0027
  • Corporate body
  • 1965 - present

SCIAF is the Scottish Catholic International Aid Fund, the official aid and international development charity of the Catholic Church in Scotland. They work in over 16 countries across Asia, Africa and Latin America, to help some of the poorest people in the world, regardless of religion, to work their way out of poverty.

Scottish Church Groups on Southern Africa

  • C0035
  • Corporate body
  • c 1980-1991

The Scottish Churches Group on Southern Africa was an umbrella organisation made up of member from Christian Aid, Church of Scotland, Congregational Union of Scotland, Scottish episcopal Church, Methodist Church, Roman Catholic Church, SCIAF and the Balmore Trust which was set up in response to the plight of South Africans living under the apartheid regime.

Scottish Churches Action for World Development

  • C0090
  • Corporate body
  • c 1985-1987

Scottish Churches Action on World Development was formed in Edinburgh in 1985 and produced a quarterly as a small scale tool for communication between one world, third world and world poverty action groups in churches in Scotland at a cost of £2.00 an issue.

Scottish Daily News

  • C0071
  • Corporate body
  • 1975

SDN was a left of centre, Glasgow based daily newspaper aimed at the Strathclyde readership. It was formed by a cooperative of workers as Britain's first worker controlled, mass circulation daily. It ran from May 1975 until the November of the same year.

Scottish Education Department | 1872-1999

  • C0113
  • Corporate body
  • 1872-1999

The Scottish Education Department (SED) came into being as the body responsible for schooling in Scotland when it was formed from the Church of Scotland's Board of Education for Scotland in 1872.

The Education (Scotland) Act 1872 made education compulsory and took over the running of schools from the Church of Scotland. Burgh as well as parish schools now came under School Boards run by local committees. It was originally called the Scotch Education Department, was a committee of the Privy Council of the United Kingdom, and had its offices in London. In 1885 the department became a responsibility of the new ministerial post of Secretary for Scotland, under whom the Scottish Office was set up in Dover House, Whitehall, London.
In 1918 the department was moved to Edinburgh and the name was changed to the Scottish Education Department, in accordance with Scottish usage. The Secretary for Scotland became the Secretary of State for Scotland in 1926. The department was renamed the Scottish Office Education Department (SOED) in 1991, and the Scottish Office Education and Industry Department (SOEID) in 1995.

With devolution in 1999 the new Scottish Executive set up the Scottish Executive Education Department (SEED) to oversee school education whilst the Scottish Executive Enterprise and Lifelong Learning Department – now Enterprise Transport and Lifelong Learning Department (ETLLD) – took over responsibility from the former SED for further and higher education.

Scottish Education and Action for Development

  • C0072
  • Corporate body
  • 1978 - present

SEAD has two main aims. Firstly to challenge the causes of poverty, social injustice and environmental degradation and secondly to support the community-based movement for positive social change – people collectively tackling challenges which have both a local and global perspective. Their work is based on the principles of: people-powered solutions; a rootedness in mutual solidarity; and an ability to learn from each other.

Scottish Immigrant Labour Council

  • C0061
  • Corporate body

The Scottish Immigrant Labour Council worked with the Indian Workers Association, Pakistan Social and Cultural Society, shop stewards committees and Labour and Communist Party branches to challenge racist and fascist ideas and to build links between black and ethnic minority communities and the trade union and labour movement. They carried out campaigning against the growing trend of restrictive and racist immigration legislation, supported the struggles of Asian workers in Loughborough, Bradford and Grunwick and held International nights to celebrate the diversity of working class cultures.

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