Showing 79 results

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Person

Glaister, Isabella Scott Scoular |1879-1954 | Principal of the Glasgow and West of Scotland College of Domestic Science

  • P0073
  • Person
  • 1879-1954

Isabella Scott Glaister (known as Ella) was born in Glasgow in 1879. She was the eldest daughter of Professor John Glaister, Regius Professor of Forensic Medicine and Public Health at the University of Glasgow.
She took up the post of Superintendent and Office Secretary (later changed to Principal) of the Glasgow and West of Scotland College of Domestic Science in March 1908. The College had just been formed from the amalgamation of the Glasgow School of Cookery and West End School of Cookery. Ella Glaister had the difficult task of managing the merger at staff level and had to oversee the four College sites dispersed across Glasgow. During her time at the College she founded the “Glasgow Cookery Book”, originally a text book on cookery which was updated over the years by staff and eventually went into public circulation. The first edition was printed in 1910. She also attended meetings of the National Union for the Technical Education of Women in Domestic Subjects and of the Association of Superintendents of Recognised Training Schools in Domestic Subjects.
Ella Glaister resigned on 9 Sep 1910 to take up the post of Scotch Education Department Inspectress of Domestic Subjects. On 24 June 1919 in Melbourne, she married Professor Harold A Woodruff and her wedding cake was presented by the College. He was a professor of veterinary pathology and director of the veterinary institute at the University of Melbourne, a widower with two small sons. In Australia she continued her pioneering work in the field of domestic science education. She was a founder of the Australian Invergowrie Homecraft Hostel and was its chief examiner from 1928 to 1949. She was also a founder and councillor of the Emily McPherson College of Domestic Economy.
She died in Melbourne on 3 March 1954.

Goldberg | Denis |b.1933 |Anti-Apartheid activist

  • P0010
  • Person
  • b. 1933

Goldberg was an engineer and political activist born in Cape Town, South Africa. He became one of the Rivonia trialists and was detained in 1963 for over 22 years until his release in 1985.

Goldberg was an Executive member of the Congress of Democrats, an organisation allied to the ANC in the Congress Alliance from the mid-1950s. After the first non racial elections in 1994 Goldberg founded the development organisation Community H.E.A.R.T. in London to help to improve living standards of black South Africans.

His work against the apartheid regime was tireless and he traveled the world on speaking tours as a spokes person for the ANC and representing the Anti-Apartheid Committee of the United Nations, visiting Scotland alongside other places. He gained the Albert Luthuli Peace Prize in recognition of his efforts.

Grant | Bernie |1944-2000 |politician

  • P0011
  • Person
  • 1944-2000

Grant was a Guyanese Labour MP for Tottenham between 1987-2000 with a left-wing trade union background, he was also an anti-apartheid campaigner, a supporter of revolutionary governments, feminist causes, black studies and a multi-racial school curriculum.

He studied mining engineering at Heriot Watt University in Edinburgh and was later involved with the work of the SC AAM, speaking at the Glasgow Green Rally of 11th June 1988, which was followed by a march to London as part of the Freedom at 70 campaign.

Gray | Robert |1928-2008 |Lord Provost of Glasgow

  • P0013
  • Person
  • 1928-2008

Gray was a tireless campaigner on behalf of Glasgow, serving as a Councillor before rising to become Lord Provost of Glasgow (1984-88), succeeding Michael Kelly.

He was one of the pioneers of the Garden Festival in 1988 and European City of Culture in 1990 – both of which did much to regenerate the concept of the city in Scotland and, indeed, throughout Europe. Gray campaigned for these events in Glasgow, and their undoubted success is a fitting testimonial to a proud Glaswegian.

During his time in the position he led a deputation of civic leaders to 10 Downing Street on the 21st anniversary of the life-sentencing of Mandela in 1985, he was also instrumental in renaming the St George's Place Nelson Mandela Place in 1986.

Gray |Alasdair | b.1932 | author

  • P0012
  • Person
  • b.1934

Gray describes himself as a 'maker of imagined objects' and produces novels, short stories, plays, poems, pamphlets and literary criticism. He is also an accomplished artist who has painted remarkable murals and is the designer and illustrator of his own books and those of other writers.

During the campaign of the SC AAM, Gray performed readings at special events held at Moir Hall in aid of the cause.

Heath | Sir Edward |1916-2005 | Former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom

  • P0060
  • Person
  • 1916-2005

Heath was British Conservative prime minister from 1970 to 1974, a troubled period which came to be seen as reflecting the failure of post-war consensual Conservatism, and produced a backlash in his party that brought Margaret Thatcher to the leadership in 1975.

As prime minister, Heath's policies seemed muddled. His only clear success was in fulfilling his long-held ambition of taking Britain into the European Community, in 1973. He preserved the consensual and moderate policies of his 1950s predecessors, but he also felt obliged to restrain public expenditure through deflationary policies, and to tackle increasing labour unrest by trying to reduce the power of trade unions. When faced with the muscle of the militant miners' union, however, Heath backed down, executing a 'u-turn' for which the Conservative Party's right wing never forgave him. Mass strikes continued, in parallel with ongoing violence in Northern Ireland. The 1974 General Election was inconclusive and Heath resigned as prime minister, to be replaced by Harold Wilson and a minority Labour government. The following year Thatcher replaced Heath as Conservative leader.

Heath remained in parliament until 2001, a constant reminder to Thatcher of the party's moderate and Europhile traditions, which Heath angrily believed she had betrayed. He died on 17 July 2005.

Henderson | Hamish |1919-2002 |poet

  • P0014
  • Person
  • 1919-2002

Hamish Henderson is seen as the founding father of Scotland's twentieth century folk renaissance. He was passionate about politics and poetry, serving in the WWII and being inspired by the ballads of the soldiers and the song making of the Italian partisans. Henderson himself rejected modernist concepts of poetry and of being a poet. He collected, translated, composed and created in a wide variety of poetic and lyric forms.

Hamish Henderson was to exhibit the same capacity to combine occasion, craft and popular impact with 'Rivonia', which became an anthem of the South African anti-apartheid movement, which was set to the tune of a famous Spanish civil war song. The song was given the ANC's blessing and Henderson sang it on stage when Mandela visited Glasgow in 1993.

Hobbs, Alexander | b 1937 | political activist

  • P0062
  • Person
  • b. 1937

Alexander Hobbs, or Sandy as he is known, was born in Aberdeen, Scotland in 1937. From 1954 to 1958 he studied psychology at the University of Aberdeen. Although not an actively political student he was a member of a small informal circle who saw socialism, humanism and science as intimately linked and around this time became a member of the Aberdeen Humanist Group.

After graduating in 1958 he continued at the University as a postgraduate although he never completed his PhD. As a postgraduate he became heavily involved in political and cultural activities, becoming the first secretary of Aberdeen Left Club. The Chair of the Club was Ken Alexander. Through his activity in the New Left, Sandy became friendly with a number of ex-communists, including Norman and Janey Buchan. In the run-up to the 1959 General Election Sandy worked nearly full-time for the South Aberdeen Labour candidate and joined the party, remaining a member for 12 years. He was also an “outside” member of the Fife Socialist League. Around this time the Labour Party founded the Young Socialists and Sandy’s political activities focused on this part of the Labour Party until he left Aberdeen in 1961.

In 1961 Sandy married a fellow student, Lois Kemp, a leading member of the student CND and daughter of Labour Party activist William Kemp. Through his association with the Young Socialists, Sandy came into contact with various Trotskyist groups who were working within the Labour Party at the time. As a result he became close to the Labour Worker group but was not a member. He joined the Dundee Left Club but became more active in the CND, especially in publicising Scottish CND. In CND he worked closely with the cartoonist Leo Baxendale, which led to his also scriptwriting for Leo's comic, Wham!"

In 1965 Sandy moved to Glasgow becoming more involved in the Labour Party, chairing his local branch and acting as Janey Buchan's campaign manager for a local government election. He was again involved in the election campaigns for the 1970 General Election after which time he resigned from the Labour Party, having become disillusioned by Harold Wilson’s government. At this time a number of single-issue campaigns were gaining in prominence and Sandy became involved with the Campaign Against Racial Discrimination (CARD) and the Glasgow Committee Against Racism.

In 1968 Sandy started as a lecturer at Edinburgh College of Commerce where he chaired the Staff Association. In 1969 he moved to Jordanhill College of Education, Glasgow, where he was involved in the Association of Lecturers in Colleges of Education in Scotland (ALCES). A further move to Paisley College, Renfrewshire, Scotland, (now University of the West of Scotland) in 1975 resulted in his membership of the Association of Lecturers in Scottish Central Institutions (ALSCI).

Upon leaving the Labour Party, Sandy became attached to the International Socialists, who later became the Socialist Workers Party. He was never comfortable with the group and left a few years later in part because he found it much more congenial working on the less sectarian radical paper, Glasgow News. He also became involved with the Chilean
Committee for Human Rights supporting refugees from the regime of Pinochet. For a time, he re-joined the Labour Party again as a way of forwarding the work of this Committee.
From the mid-1970s onwards Sandy dropped out of active politics while his wife, Lois, continued to play an active part in the Women’s Movement and Glasgow Women’s Aid. Instead, he concentrated on research, writing and publishing as a lecturer within the Department of Applied Social Sciences at the University of Paisley and qualifying as a Chartered Psychologist which he achieved in 1990. In 1997, he became a Reader at the University of Paisley (University of the West of Scotland) and in 2002 became an Honorary Research Fellow concentrating on child labour and contemporary legends. In 2011, in collaboration with Willie Thompson, Sandy published the book, Out of the Burning House, which contains accounts of their political activities in the 1950s and early 1960s.

Hodge, David | c. 1909-1991 | former Lord Provost of Glasgow

  • P0062
  • Person
  • c. 1909-1991

David Hodge first served on Glasgow Corporation in 1971 and was chairman of the magistrates committee, becoming chairman of the licensing committee after local government reorganisation in 1974. He was chairman of Glasgow Constituency Labour Party and secretary of the Labour group on the council before becoming Lord Provost from May 1977 to 1980. The Labour whip was withdrawn from him after he entertained the South African ambassador to lunch at the City Chambers.

Huddleston| Trevor|1913-1998| Archbishop of the Church of the Province of the Indian Ocean

  • P0016
  • Person
  • 1913-1998

Born in England, Huddleston studied at Christ Church, Oxford University (1927-1931) before enrolling at Wells Theological College, taking his vows in 1941. He then ministered in townships in South Africa between 1943 and 1956. During the following years he became involved in protests alongside Nelson Mandela and continued to campaign and speak out against the apartheid regime after this, gaining awards from the ANC among others for his work.

In 1959 he addressed the founding meeting of the Anti-Apartheid Movement in London and in 1961 he was appointed Vice-President of the AAM, a position he held until 1981.

Huddelston often visited Scotland and was involved in key events in the SC AAM campaign, including: speaking at the 1988 Glasgow Green rally that was followed by a march down to London as part of the Freedom at 70 campaign, presenting Indres Naidoo with a giant key to symbolically open Mandela's cell door at the same rally, and speaking at the Sechaba Conference in Glasgow in 1990.

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