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Queen’s College, Glasgow | Academic and Professional Standards Committee | 1990-1993

  • C0120
  • Corporate body
  • 1990-1993

The Academic and Professional Standards Committee was formed following the introduction of the Central Institutions (Scotland) Regulations (1988) the Governing Body when the academic structure of the College was re-organised into faculties. It was responsible for the maintenance and enhancement of academic standards on courses being offered by the College and examining the feasibility of proposals for new courses in terms of academic content, physical resources and staffing. It oversaw the work of the Validation Panels and Credit Accumulation and Transfer Sub-committee and was responsible for monitoring the appointment of external assessors by the Faculties.
Membership included Principal; Vice-Principal; Deans of Faculty; Head of Quality Assurance Unit; 4 Course Leaders (2 nominated by each faculty); 4 Teaching staff (2 elected from each faculty); 1 representative of the Academic Council; 2 Student members appointed by the Student Representative Council; co-opted members as required.

Queen’s College, Glasgow | Central Academic Services Committee | 1983-1991

  • C0118
  • Corporate body
  • 1983-1991

The Central Academic Services Committee was set up by the Academic Council in September 1982, mainly as a response to comments made in the Institutional Review Report. It's role was to advise the Academic Council on policy issues related to the development of the Library, Learning Resources Centre, Computer Centre, non specialist teaching rooms and the Student Advisory Centre. It oversaw the work of the sub-committees and working groups relating to the services serving the academic sectors of the College.

It's members included the Principal; Vice-principal; Secretary and Treasurer; Director, Computer Centre; Senior Lecturer, Learning Resources Centre; Chief Librarian; Student Counsellor; four elected members of the academic staff; two representatives of the technical and administrative staff; two student members.

The sub-committees included:
-Library sub-committee
-Learning Resources sub-committee
-Computer Services sub-committee
The first meeting of the Committee was held on 15 February 1983.

Queen’s College, Glasgow | Course Development Committee | 1980-1990

  • C0117
  • Corporate body
  • 1980-1990

The Course Development, Validating and Monitoring Committee (shortened to Course Development Committee in 1982) was a Standing Committee of the Academic Council. It was responsible for encouraging the development of new courses, examining the feasibility of proposed courses and appointing a Course Planning Committee responsible for developing adopted courses. Each stage of course planning and validation had to be approved by the Committee and it was also responsible for monitoring progress of existing courses.

Membership was as follows: Principal; Vice-Principal; Secretary and Treasurer; Heads and Associate Heads of Departments; Senior Librarian; Senior lecturer, Learning Resources Centre; up to five other members elected from the academic staff, up to four members, with appropriate experience, from outwith the College; one student representative appointed by the Student Representative Council. The Academic Council elected the Chair of the Committee who would serve no longer than three years. Appointed members would serve for not more than two years but could be re-appointed without a break in service. Appointments were made in September unless a vacancy occurred.

Queen’s College, Glasgow | Governing Body | 1908-1993

  • C0115
  • Corporate body
  • 1908-1993

The Governing Body managed the business of the Association. The first Governing Body was a Board of Governors made up of 27 members elected and approved by the Association at the Annual General Meeting. Nine women and twelve men were elected from the Association and another six were nominated members, representatives from local School Boards, Councils and The Merchants House of Glasgow.
The Governors held office for 3 years on a rotational basis where one third of them would retire from office each year. General Meetings of the Governors were held 4 times a year and the Chairman of the Governors was elected at the December meeting. The Chairman would hold office for 1 year but could be re-elected without a break in service.

Chairmen of the Board of Governors of the College:
-Dr Paul Rottenberg, 1908-1915
-Sir Samuel Chisholm, 1915-1923
-Sir Andrew Hislop Pettigrew, 1924-1942
-Mr Osbourne R Hatrick, 1942-1946
-Mr John F Carson, 1946-1953
-Mr A I MacKenzie, 1953-1965
-Mrs Margaret B Cross, 1965-1968
-Mrs Barbara H Quaile, 1968-1971
-Mr George C Parker, 1971-1980
-Ian Hutchison, 1980-1988
-Eric Miller, 1989-1990
-Celia Urquhart-Logie, 1990-1993

The Governors dealt with the affairs of the College through a series of appointed Committees, each managing different aspects of the work of the College. At the Governors’ meetings the minutes of all the appointed Committees which had met since the last Governors meeting were discussed, along with finance and any other business relating to the College. The membership of each committee was confirmed and listed in the minutes of the Governors’ meeting following the Annual General Meeting (AGM) of the Association.

The first committees were: Governors; Property and Finance; Housewifery; Cookery; Laundry and Dressmaking; and Educational Methods. Some of the committees also had sub-committees and special sub-committees could be formed to deal with particular tasks. In 1912 a Buildings Committee was introduced to manage the building of new premises at Park Drive. This was disbanded in 1919 but re-instated in 1934 to manage the building of the extension at Park Drive. In the 1930s the Playing Fields and Science committees were established. The arrival of a new Principal, Isobel Gibson, in 1947 brought new ideas and retirement of staff members initiated a re-organisation of staff and the administration structure. The Cookery Committee, Housewifery Committee, Laundry and Dressmaking committee and their respective sub-committees were abolished and replaced by a Technical Committee. At this time a Hostels committee was also established to manage the student residences.

By January 1960 Educational Methods Committee and Science committee were abolished, although the Committees had not sat for some time before that. In 1969 the committees changed again with Governors; Educational and Technical; Hostels and Student Welfare; Buildings and Property; Conditions of Service replacing previous committees.

In 1972 an Academic Council was instituted according to the terms of the Central Institutions (Scotland) Regulations (1972). The Academic Council discharged the functions of the Governing Body relating to the overall planning, coordination, development and supervision of the academic work of the College. The Academic Council met for the first time on 20 Feb 1973.

When the Central Institutions (Scotland) Amendment Regulations 1974 were introduced the Board of Governors was replaced by a Governing Body. It had its first meeting on 26 June 1974. There were thirty Governors in total: Principal, Vice-Principal; President of the Student Representative Council (SRC); six elected by and from the Members of the Association; seventeen appointed Governors (two appointed by the Secretary of State) from Local Authority Councils, Academic Institutions, Business Associations, SRC, etc; four co-opted by the Governors. When the Local Authorities merged to form Strathclyde Regional Council in 1976 the representation of local authorities on the Governing Body decreased, giving it a greater emphasis on the business community and student employers. Other Committees were introduced in the 1970s including: Social and Recreational; Publicity; Centenary Celebrations.

In 1980 a Staffing Committee and Finance and General Purposes Committee were formed. Following the introduction of the Central Institutions (Scotland) Regulations 1988 a new Governing Body was structure was brought in, reducing the number of Governors. The new Governing Body met for the first time in January 1989. When the College merged with Glasgow Polytechnic in 1993 to become Glasgow Caledonian University all the committees were disbanded. The final meeting of the Governing Body was held on 25 March 1993 and to mark the occasion a formal dinner was held afterwards in the Park View Suite (the College’s hospitality suite). Each of the Governors were presented with an individually engraved Royal Stuart bowl.

The main appointed committees and dates they served:
-Governors – 1907-1974, Governing Body – 1975-1993
-Property and Finance – 1909-1969, Finance – 1969-1979, Finance and General Purposes – 1969-1993
-Housewifery – 1909-1948
-Cookery – 1909-1948
-Laundry and Dressmaking – 1909-1948
-Educational Methods – 1909-1959 (although this committee is listed in the Governors’ minutes there were no minutes for this committee after 1948).
-Building – 1912-1919, 1934-1937, Buildings and Property – 1969-1988
-Science – 1936-1959 (although this committee is listed in the Governors’ minutes there were no minutes for this committee after 1948).
-Playing Fields – 1939-1968, Social and Recreational – 1973-1976
-Technical – 1949-1968, Education and Technical – 1969-1977
-Hostels – 1949-1968, Hostels and Student Welfare – 1969-1988, Student Affairs 1990-1992
-Conditions of Service – 1969-1980, Staffing – 1980-1993
-Centenary Celebrations – 1974
-Publicity - 1975

Queen’s College, Glasgow | Association | 1908-1993

  • C0114
  • Corporate body
  • 1908-1993

When the Glasgow School of Cookery was amalgamating with the West End School of Cookery to become one institution, it was decided to set up an Association in order to resolve disputes about representation on the new Board of Governors. A meeting was held on 19 December 1907 to launch the new Association and adopt the Articles of Association which had been framed by the two schools and approved by the Scotch Education Department. The Association was named The Glasgow and West of Scotland College of Domestic Science and was incorporated under the Companies Acts 1862 to 1900 as an Association limited by Guarantee.

The Association was formed of up to 500 subscribed members, who were responsible for the election of a governing body. Initially there were 247 subscribers who paid the fee of £1: 1s to become registered members of the Association. The Memorandum and Articles of Association cite Dr P Rottenburg, Mr T F Donald, Mr G B Hoggan, Miss I Gray, Mrs M Cowan, Miss E Donnal, Miss A McCall Anderson, Mr A C Scott and Mr H Carvick Webster as witnesses on 14 May 1908. Interested potential members were required to write a letter of application and pay the membership fee. New members were read out at the Governors’ meetings for approval. By 1975 the membership fee was £1.05 and by 1980 a membership application form had to be completed with payment of the fee. These applications were considered at the Annual General Meeting (AGM) when current members would elect the new members.

The business of the Association was managed by a Governing Body. Ordinary (or Annual) General Meetings of the Association were held once a year when the Treasurer’s Accounts and Report of the Governing Body were presented to the members. Elections were held to select Governors to replace those at the end of their rotation, re-elect the Auditor and approve new members. Any other important business relating to the College was also dealt with at the meeting. The Chairman of the Governors presided as chair at the meetings of the Association. The AGM was held in December/January until 1962 when it moved to April/May. Extraordinary General Meetings could be called at any time when the Association was required to make decisions on major issues concerning the College. The Secretary and Treasurer of the College was responsible for the administration of the Association.

The Association had a Common Seal which was used on official documents. These also had to be signed by the College Secretary and at least two of the Governors on behalf of the Association.

Paterson, Grace Chalmers | 1843-1925 | Principal of the Glasgow School of Cookery

  • P0065
  • Person
  • 1843-1925

Grace Chalmers Paterson was born on 25 July 1843 at 130 Hope Street, Glasgow, daughter of Georgina and Walter Paterson, a merchant. In 1875, at the age of 32 years, now living at 8 Claremont Terrace, Glasgow, Grace joined the first Ladies’ Executive Committee for the establishment of the Glasgow School of Cookery, becoming its Honorary Secretary (effectively Principal of the school), and was recognised as the driving force behind the school. Her role as Principal was on a supervisory level and she fought and succeeded to introduce cookery and domestic economy to the teaching curriculum of Scottish schools. She was one of the first two women elected to the Glasgow School Board in April 1885.
Grace was an active campaigner for education and womens’ issues, a member of the Association for the Higher Education of Women. She retired in 1908 and moved to Edinburgh, where she died on November 1925 at the age of 82 years. Her obituary in the Glasgow Herald stated “A convinced and active suffragist, she also believed in women and their capacity both of original work and for organising and directing the work of others. She desired for women equal pay and equal moral standards, and her friendly interest was warmly appreciated by women in the teaching profession.”

Andross, Mary | 1893-1968 |Teacher and Head of Science Department, Glasgow and West of Scotland College of Domestic Science

  • P0074
  • Person
  • 1893 – 1968

Mary Andross (known as Maryann ) was born on the 17th of March 1895 in Irvine, Ayrshire. She graduated with a BSc from Glasgow University in 1916 and thereafter undertook post graduate work with Professor George G Henderson, firstly at the Technical College (now Strathclyde University), and then at the University of Glasgow. During World War I she worked as a day teacher at Irvine Royal Academy, 1916-1917, and then at the Ministry of Munitions Inspections Department on poison gases, 1917-1919. From 1919 to 1923 she worked as a Chemistry Assistant at the University of Glasgow.
Mary Andross was appointed as lecturer in the Science Department of the Glasgow and West of Scotland College of Domestic Science on 1 September 1924, becoming Head of the Department in 1933. There she pioneered courses for the training of dieticians and made many original contributions to developing knowledge of the chemical composition of food. By 1936 a new diet kitchen and research laboratory for dieticians was added to the College. This facilitated her opportunity for research. In particular, she applied analytical procedures to determine the effect of cooking on the nutrients in every day foodstuffs. In this field her most notable contributions were to the study of changes in food proteins, especially during the cooking of meat and of eggs. She was an inspiring and able lecturer and was not only popular with her students but was much sought after as a public speaker, particularly in the Women’s Rural Institute and Women’s Guild meetings.
She gained the respect of chemists and food scientists. In 1951 she became a Fellow of the Royal Institute of Chemistry and in 1964 a Fellow of the Institute of Food Science and Technology. She was also a member of the Nutrition Society and of the Society of Chemical Industry, and served on the committees of both.
During World War II she excelled in three major areas of work. She carried out research on sources of vitamin C, especially in work with rosehips, and in producing cost effective nutritious menus to make rations go further. She was one of the leading organisers and active participants in the canteen for servicemen, which was run by the College in St Enoch Station and in providing the backup service of the mobile canteen. She played a leading role in the College’s canning, bottling and pickling service in 1940, and headed a team of staff members who used their vacations to offer this important service to rural areas and districts around Scotland.
She also contributed to the social life of the College, helping to organise events, being involved in sporting activities and becoming President of the College Former Students’ Association. She loved the outdoors and her hobbies were fishing and the history and customs of Scotland, especially the Ayrshire and the West Highlands. She also loved visiting the island of Harris which became almost like her second home.
Mary Andross retired from the College in June 1965 and died in her native Ayrshire in February 1968.

Glaister, Isabella Scott Scoular |1879-1954 | Principal of the Glasgow and West of Scotland College of Domestic Science

  • P0073
  • Person
  • 1879-1954

Isabella Scott Glaister (known as Ella) was born in Glasgow in 1879. She was the eldest daughter of Professor John Glaister, Regius Professor of Forensic Medicine and Public Health at the University of Glasgow.
She took up the post of Superintendent and Office Secretary (later changed to Principal) of the Glasgow and West of Scotland College of Domestic Science in March 1908. The College had just been formed from the amalgamation of the Glasgow School of Cookery and West End School of Cookery. Ella Glaister had the difficult task of managing the merger at staff level and had to oversee the four College sites dispersed across Glasgow. During her time at the College she founded the “Glasgow Cookery Book”, originally a text book on cookery which was updated over the years by staff and eventually went into public circulation. The first edition was printed in 1910. She also attended meetings of the National Union for the Technical Education of Women in Domestic Subjects and of the Association of Superintendents of Recognised Training Schools in Domestic Subjects.
Ella Glaister resigned on 9 Sep 1910 to take up the post of Scotch Education Department Inspectress of Domestic Subjects. On 24 June 1919 in Melbourne, she married Professor Harold A Woodruff and her wedding cake was presented by the College. He was a professor of veterinary pathology and director of the veterinary institute at the University of Melbourne, a widower with two small sons. In Australia she continued her pioneering work in the field of domestic science education. She was a founder of the Australian Invergowrie Homecraft Hostel and was its chief examiner from 1928 to 1949. She was also a founder and councillor of the Emily McPherson College of Domestic Economy.
She died in Melbourne on 3 March 1954.

Calder, Juliann MacKinnon |1914-2008 | Principal of the Glasgow and West of Scotland College of Domestic Science

  • P0070
  • Person
  • 1914-2008

Juliann MacKinnon Calder (also known as Sheila Calder to close friends), was born in Glasgow in 1914. She graduated in 1936 with a BSc (Hons) Chemistry from the University of Glasgow. She then attended Jordanhill College of Education where she was awarded a double qualification in primary and secondary teaching. Following qualification she taught in primary schools in Kinross and Glasgow.

In January 1940 she was appointed to the Glasgow and West of Scotland College of Domestic Science where she taught Inorganic Chemistry, Organic Chemistry, Physiology and Hygiene. Drawing on her specialism in organic chemistry, she developed studies in textiles and synthetic materials. Whilst working full time she studied for a Master in Education, which she was awarded in 1948 from the University of Glasgow.

When Isobel Gibson, the Principal of the Glasgow and West of Scotland College of Domestic Science retired at the end of 1962, Juliann Calder was appointed her successor. Her strength of leadership guided the College through an important period of academic development. A new extension to the College to cater primarily for the sciences, was formally opened in September 1975. The new building was named the Calder Wing in honour of her work.

In 1975, under Juliann Calder’s administration, the College not only celebrated its centenary, but also received a royal accolade, changing its name to The Queen’s College, Glasgow. In that same year, Juliann Calder donated £200 to provide an annual prize in chemistry, which she asked to be named the Mary Andross prize in recognition of the contribution her former Head of Science had made to the College. Students were able to enrol on the first College degree course in Dietetics in September 1976 and one of her successors, Dr John Philips, said that “in many ways she brought the College forward 20 years academically.”

She was a Fellow of the Chemical Society; the Educational Institute of Scotland; and the Association of Home Economists. She was a past president of the Scottish Branch of the Association of Women Science Teachers and a member of several professional bodies, including the Society of Chemical Industry; the Catering and Institutional Management Association; the Association of Home Economists; and the Council of the National Committee for Education in Home Economics. She also served on several committees, notably being a member of the steering committee which set up organisation for the Scottish Certificate of Education Examination Board.

Juliann Calder retired as Principal on 31st August, 1976. She died in Glasgow on 28 December 2008 at the age of 94 years.

Gibson, Isobel Scott | 1897-1993 |OBE JP, Principal of the Glasgow and West of Scotland College of Domestic Science

  • P0069
  • Person
  • 1897-1993

Isobel Scott Gibson was born in Glasgow in 1897, the daughter of George A Gibson, Professor of Mathematics at the University of Glasgow. Her father was involved with the Glasgow and West of Scotland College of Domestic Science as a Governor from session 1911/12 until his resignation in December 1925. He was also involved with the Board at Park School in Glasgow, joining in May 1915 and rising to Chairman of the Board of this prestigious girl's school in August 1917. Isobel Gibson also went on to become a member of the Board at Park School and a Director of the School Company.

Isobel Gibson was educated at the Park School, Glasgow, and then studied for a teaching diploma at the Glasgow and West of Scotland College of Domestic Science. In 1917 she left the College to work in the kitchens of the Erskine Hospital for limbless soldiers. She returned to the College 2 years later to complete her teacher training. In 1920 she took a one year course at the King's College of Household and Social Science in London. She returned to Glasgow in 1921 to teach at Park School. In 1927, at the age of 30 years, she entered the University of Glasgow to study for a BSc in Applied Science, specialising in chemistry and physiology.

After graduating in 1930, Isobel Gibson went to work in Edinburgh as a Superintendent of Domestic Subjects with the Education Authority. Promotion followed in 1937 to the general staff of the Scottish Education Department's Inspectorate and in 1944 she was again promoted to the rank of His Majesty's Inspectorate. In January 1947 she took up her new position of Principal at the Glasgow and West of Scotland College of Domestic Science. In June 1951 she was awarded an OBE in recognition of her work.

During her career she helped the College recover from the war and struggle through the period of scarcity and rationing. She encouraged the academic developments of the College and put much work into the establishment of a proper library at Park Drive. She also played an important role within the International Federation of Home Economics, being elected as its president in 1959. She was also a president of the Glasgow branch of the British Federation of University Women. She instigated the new student residences at Dorchester Avenue that were formally opened by the Queen in 1968. The residences were named Gibson Hall in recognition of her vital role.

After her retirement at the end of 1962, Isobel Gibson moved to Edinburgh to live. In May 1993, she died in a nursing home, aged 96 years.

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