Showing 277 results

names

British Youth Council

  • C0074
  • Corporate body
  • 1948 - present

The British Youth Council is the National Youth Council of the UK. They are a youth-led charity that empower young people aged 25 and under to influence and inform the decisions that affect their lives. They support young people to get involved in their communities and democracy locally, nationally and internationally, making a difference as volunteers, campaigners, decision-makers and leaders.

Buchan | Janey | 1926-2012 | politician

  • P0006
  • Person
  • 1926-2012

Buchan was a cultural and political activist who became a Strathclyde Councillor (1974-79) and then Glasgow MEP (1979-94). Her involvement with the SC AAM and it's cause was manifold, with special contributions including: speaking at the press conference that announced Chris Hani's assassination and speaking at the NALA conference in Glasgow when Nelson Mandela visited Glasgow to receive the Freedom of the Nine Cities. She was famously embraced by Mandela while welcoming him on his visit to Strasbourg.

Buchanan, Glen | b 1955 | social enterprise research and development coordinator

  • P0076
  • Person
  • b 1955

Glen Buchanan was born on 29 October 1955 and grew up and attended school in Kirkcudbright, Scotland. He studied at Paisley College of Technology, graduating with a BA in Social Studies in 1977, followed by an MBA from the University of Bradford in 1978.
From 1979 to 1981 he worked for the Scottish Council for Single Homeless managing a project looking at the housing experiences and needs of single people in Scotland. This paved the way for a major expansion of housing options and opportunities for single people across the 1980s and thereafter. In 1981 he took up the position of research fellow in the Local Government Unit at Paisley College of Technology, where he first worked alongside John Pearce on the Local Enterprise Advisory Project (LEAP), and worked on the case studies of the community enterprises Flagstone Enterprises Ltd, Paisley, and Govan Workspace, Glasgow. In 1984 he began working for Strathclyde Community Business (SCB) as Training Officer, eventually becoming Depute General Manager for John Pearce. SCB was the major development agency for community businesses in the west of Scotland providing information and advice, development support, training and financial assistance. Throughout this time he was also a Director of Community Business Scotland Ltd (CBS) and from 1884 to 1988 was editor of ‘CB News’, promoting the wider social enterprise movement in Scotland and beyond.
From 1991 to 1993 Glen Buchanan worked as National Coordinator, Care and Repair Initiative, Glasgow, for Shelter Scotland. He was responsible for management of eight council-wide projects across Scotland and negotiating support for the national development of Care and Repair into the mainstream of housing practice. In 1993 he was appointed by Scottish Homes to coordinate national development of Care and Repair throughout Scotland, later working on local housing and planning strategy development. He worked for Communities Scotland when it took on the functions of Scottish Homes and widened its community regeneration remit and then for the Scottish Government as Policy Manager, Glasgow, from 2008 to 2010. In each role he worked on the provision of grant and development support to housing associations, social enterprises and other third sector organisations. He went on to work for various organisations in consumer rights, housing, health and social care, and social enterprise until his retirement in 2016.

Buchanan|Kevin||Anti-Apartheid activist

  • P0049
  • Person

Buchanan co-managed the South African musician Marah Louw's fundraising tour of the UK in 1994 with Angela Webb. The tour visited the cities which had given Mandela their Freedom as well as Edinburgh and Liverpool. The tour raised funds for the ANC's electoral campaign.

Budd | Zola | b.1966 | Athlete

  • P0056
  • Person
  • b. 1966

Zola Budd was born on 26 May 1966 in Bloemfontein, Free State, South Africa. Budd burst into national prominence in 1983. In 1984 she gained international recognition when, at the age of 17, she broke the women's 5000m world record. As this performance took place in apartheid South Africa, the world track and field establishment refused to recognise the record. However, she was later to claim the world record officially, while representing Great Britain in 1985, clocking 14:48.07.

Despite being a world class athlete she could not compete in the 1984 Olympic games as South Africa had been banned from competing before the start of the Tokyo Olympic games in 1964. In 1984, Budd was granted a British passport and participated in the British team in the Los Angeles Olympic Games in that year. In the final of the 3,000m race, Budd and Mary Decker, the American favourite to win, accidentally collided. Budd eventually finished seventh, while Decker was carried from the track side. Although the International Amateur Athletics Federation (IAAF) jury found that Budd was not responsible for the collision, she was booed by the crowd who favoured Decker.

In a low key event in Crystal Palace, England, Budd on 26 August 1985 broke the 5 000m world record set by Ingrid Kristiansens of Norway sixteen years previously by more than ten seconds to set a new mark of 15 minutes 1.83 seconds. Budd stunned the sporting fraternity by running bare footed on her way to claim this magnificent feat. As South Africa was banned from competing in any sporting code with other countries, the event took place without publicity that might have attracted anti-apartheid demonstrators.

Budd returned to South Africa after she was banned by the IAAF in 1988 because she allegedly took part in an event in this country, though she insisted that she only attended the event and did not run. She retired from international competition for several years, but began racing again in South Africa and had an excellent season in 1991, when she was the second fastest woman in the world over 3,000m.

Budd is married to Mike Pieterse, a South African businessman and has three children. She still runs 16 – 24 km a day.

Calder, Juliann MacKinnon |1914-2008 | Principal of the Glasgow and West of Scotland College of Domestic Science

  • P0070
  • Person
  • 1914-2008

Juliann MacKinnon Calder (also known as Sheila Calder to close friends), was born in Glasgow in 1914. She graduated in 1936 with a BSc (Hons) Chemistry from the University of Glasgow. She then attended Jordanhill College of Education where she was awarded a double qualification in primary and secondary teaching. Following qualification she taught in primary schools in Kinross and Glasgow.

In January 1940 she was appointed to the Glasgow and West of Scotland College of Domestic Science where she taught Inorganic Chemistry, Organic Chemistry, Physiology and Hygiene. Drawing on her specialism in organic chemistry, she developed studies in textiles and synthetic materials. Whilst working full time she studied for a Master in Education, which she was awarded in 1948 from the University of Glasgow.

When Isobel Gibson, the Principal of the Glasgow and West of Scotland College of Domestic Science retired at the end of 1962, Juliann Calder was appointed her successor. Her strength of leadership guided the College through an important period of academic development. A new extension to the College to cater primarily for the sciences, was formally opened in September 1975. The new building was named the Calder Wing in honour of her work.

In 1975, under Juliann Calder’s administration, the College not only celebrated its centenary, but also received a royal accolade, changing its name to The Queen’s College, Glasgow. In that same year, Juliann Calder donated £200 to provide an annual prize in chemistry, which she asked to be named the Mary Andross prize in recognition of the contribution her former Head of Science had made to the College. Students were able to enrol on the first College degree course in Dietetics in September 1976 and one of her successors, Dr John Philips, said that “in many ways she brought the College forward 20 years academically.”

She was a Fellow of the Chemical Society; the Educational Institute of Scotland; and the Association of Home Economists. She was a past president of the Scottish Branch of the Association of Women Science Teachers and a member of several professional bodies, including the Society of Chemical Industry; the Catering and Institutional Management Association; the Association of Home Economists; and the Council of the National Committee for Education in Home Economics. She also served on several committees, notably being a member of the steering committee which set up organisation for the Scottish Certificate of Education Examination Board.

Juliann Calder retired as Principal on 31st August, 1976. She died in Glasgow on 28 December 2008 at the age of 94 years.

Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament

  • C0070
  • Corporate body
  • 1958 - present

CND campaigns non-violently to rid the world of nuclear weapons and other weapons of mass destruction and to create genuine security for future generations.

CND opposes all nuclear and other weapons of mass destruction: their development, manufacture, testing, deployment and use or threatened use by any country.

Catholic Institute for International Relations

  • C0030
  • Corporate body
  • 1940 - present

CIIR now Progressio are a UK based charity that works internationally. They have been active for over 75 years with Catholic roots and believe that poor and marginalised people can gain the power to transform their lives through a program of skill sharing and advocacy. They work with people of all faiths and none.

Catholic International Cooperation for Development and Solidarity

  • C0037
  • Corporate body
  • 1962 - present

CIDSE was officially registered as a non-profit organisation under Belgian law in 1967. However, Catholic charities had already been meeting since 1964 with the intention of creating an ‘international working group for socio-economic development’. CIDSE was founded to coordinate tasks identified by the Second Vatican Council as important tasks for the Catholic Church, namely, to care for the poor and the oppressed and to work for more justice on a global level.

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