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Person

Pahad, Essop | b 1939 | politician

  • P0037
  • Person
  • b 1939

Essop Pahad is the Former Minister in the Presidency of Republic of South Africa from 1999 to 2008. Previously he had been involved with the African National Congress and the South African Communist Party.

He came to Glasgow in 1986 to rename Nelson Mandela Place and was present at the dinner for the Scottish delegation to South Africa in 1994.

Paterson, Grace Chalmers | 1843-1925 | Principal of the Glasgow School of Cookery

  • P0065
  • Person
  • 1843-1925

Grace Chalmers Paterson was born on 25 July 1843 at 130 Hope Street, Glasgow, daughter of Georgina and Walter Paterson, a merchant. In 1875, at the age of 32 years, now living at 8 Claremont Terrace, Glasgow, Grace joined the first Ladies’ Executive Committee for the establishment of the Glasgow School of Cookery, becoming its Honorary Secretary (effectively Principal of the school), and was recognised as the driving force behind the school. Her role as Principal was on a supervisory level and she fought and succeeded to introduce cookery and domestic economy to the teaching curriculum of Scottish schools. She was one of the first two women elected to the Glasgow School Board in April 1885.
Grace was an active campaigner for education and womens’ issues, a member of the Association for the Higher Education of Women. She retired in 1908 and moved to Edinburgh, where she died on November 1925 at the age of 82 years. Her obituary in the Glasgow Herald stated “A convinced and active suffragist, she also believed in women and their capacity both of original work and for organising and directing the work of others. She desired for women equal pay and equal moral standards, and her friendly interest was warmly appreciated by women in the teaching profession.”

Pearce, John | 1942 - 2011 | social enterprise pioneer

  • P0064
  • Person
  • 1942-2011

John Pearce was born on 23rd March 1942 in Truro, Cornwall. He studied at Cambridge University and the London School of Economics graduating with a BA (Hons) and a diploma in Social Administration in 1963 and 1965 respectively. Between 1963 and 1971 he worked in community development programmes with several national and international organisations, including Tibetan refugee resettlement project with Nepal Red Cross, and as a field worker with the Young Volunteer Force Foundation in North Devon. Pearce then became the director of one of 12 Community Development Projects, a major national initiative of the Callaghan government, in West Cumbria from 1972-1976. As part of the project he formed a community based housing association; the first industrial co-operative development project in England; successful self-help initiatives with young people and the elderly; research into tourism and into local male unemployment; and the established a local information centre. His experience on this project informed his approach to developing community business upon moving to Scotland when the CDP programme was wound up. From around this time he was involved in the Industrial Common Ownership Movement (ICOM) and chaired its lending committee, ICOF.
John Pearce was appointed to the Local Enterprise Advisory Project (LEAP), based within Paisley College of Technology, in 1978 where he worked with people living in disadvantaged urban housing schemes in the west of Scotland. Pearce pioneered the concept and practice of community business in Scotland and was a founder member of Community Business Scotland (CBS, which later became CBS Network Ltd). He became General Manager of Strathclyde Community Business (SCB) in 1984. SCB was the major development agency for community businesses in the west of Scotland providing information and advice, development support, training and financial assistance. From 1991-2010 he worked as a community enterprise consultant and researcher, continuing to manage development projects, run social accounting training sessions and to write on community enterprise in the UK, Australia, New Zealand and India. He wrote several books including "Social Enterprise in Anytown" published by the Calouste Gulbenkian Foundation in 2003.
John Pearce died on 12 December 2011.

Pedersen, Roy Norman | b 1943 | Economic and social development consultant and author

  • P0079
  • Person
  • b 1943

Roy Norman Pedersen was born in Ardrossan, Ayrshire, on 29 November 1943. The family moved to Aberdeen in 1948 where Pedersen graduated from the University of Aberdeen with an MA in Geography and Economic History. He spent a brief spell in London where he worked for the civil service and created and published the first Gaelic map of Scotland. He then moved to Inverness and in 1971 began working for the Highlands and Islands Development Board (HIDB). Early in this career, he was the original architect of the concept of Road Equivalent Tariff (RET), the distance-based ferry charging system. In 1978 Pedersen was appointed as Social Development Officer, assisting with the pioneering Community Co-operative Scheme. The programme offered support and funding for the establishment of community co-operatives and enabled the creation of over a hundred self-sustaining community owned enterprises throughout the Highlands and Islands. In 1987, Pedersen was promoted to Head of Social Development, and continued to work in that post with HIDB successor, Highlands and Islands Enterprise (HIE), until 1993. Between 1994 and 1997 he was seconded as Development Director of Comunn na Gàidhlig, supporting revival of the Gaelic language.
On retirement from HIE in 2001 he founded Pedersen Consulting, specialising in regional economic and cultural development in transport, heritage, Gaelic, community and social enterprise sectors. Pedersen has written and spoken on a variety of issues connected with the history, present and future development of the “New Scotland” and its wider international setting. His published works include non-fiction, such as ' Who pays the ferryman? The great Scottish ferries swindle" (Birlinn, 2013) and "Gaelic guerrilla: John Angus Mackay: Gael extraordinaire" (Luath Press, 2019), fictional murder mysteries, and map translations into Gaelic, Welsh, Old Norse and Scots. Pedersen served as an elected SNP Highland councillor from 2007 to 2012 and chaired several bodies including HI-Arts, Acair publishers, Ainmean-Àite na h-Alba (Gaelic Place-names of Scotland), and the Scottish Government’s Ferry Industry Advisory Group.

Phillips, John Clifford | b 1943 | Principal of The Queen's College, Glasgow

  • P0072
  • Person
  • b 1943

John Clifford Phillips was born in Dyfed, Wales, on 29 January 1943. He attended Llandeilo Grammar School before studying Mathematics at Aberystwyth University and graduating with a BSc in 1964.

He started his career as an engineering mathematician, later becoming a specialist in systems development. After graduating he carried out research at the Mathematics Department of the University of Glasgow. During this period he met his wife, Anne Margaret and they were married in 1967. That same year he took up a position as lecturer at Lancashire Polytechnic. After 2 years he moved to Leeds Polytechnic where he remained until 1990. Initially employed as lecturer he had a series of promotions, eventually becoming Head of the School of Mathematics and Computing in 1986 and then Dean for the Faculty of Engineering and Computing in 1987. His final post at the Polytechnic, between 1988 and 1990, was as Senior, Executive, External Development. He was responsible for the Polytechnic’s external income generation work and undertook consultancy work in Brunei, Guyana, Tanzania, Hong Kong and China, mainly in training needs analysis and institutional management. After leaving Leeds Polytechnic he worked as a freelance consultant before taking on the role of Principal of The Queen’s College, Glasgow, in February 1991.

His management experience equipped him to lead the College through a difficult period of uncertainty culminating in merger with Glasgow Polytechnic in 1993 to become Glasgow Caledonian University. John Phillips was appointed Vice-Principal of the new University.

Rice, Clive Edward Butler | 1949-2015 | cricketer

  • P0057
  • Person
  • 1949-2015

Rice was the former South Africa cricket captain who led the national team on their return from isolation. He played only three ODIs for South Africa because his career coincided with the country's sporting isolation during apartheid. At the age of 22, he had been selected for the 1971-72 tour of Australia before it was cancelled. Then at the age of 42, Rice captained South Africa in their first series after the end of isolation - to India in 1991- but was left out of their 1992 World Cup squad and did not play for his country again.

Richardson, Geoffrey Alan | b 1936 | Principal of The Queen's College, Glasgow

  • P0071
  • Person
  • b 1936

Geoffrey Alan Richardson was born in Lancashire on 27 July 1936. He graduated with an MA (Hons) in Geography from Fitzwilliam College, Cambridge in 1958. He went on to gain his teaching certificate from Exeter University in 1959, before beginning his career as a geography teacher.

He taught in primary and secondary schools in England and Australia, where he and his wife lived for 3 years. On their return to England he became a senior tutor in Ilkley College of Education, Yorkshire and his career interests developed into education management. He was awarded a diploma in Education Management from Sheffield Polytechnic in 1973. His role at the College included teaching students of environmental studies, home economics, professional studies and teaching practice as well as having overall responsibility for student welfare in the College and for a hall of residence. He was involved in education management developments at the College and began research on a part-time basis at the University of Manchester towards a masters degree in Education. He also wrote several geography textbooks at this time. He was a man of wide interests, he fished, ran 3 miles every morning and had been principal clarinettist in the Cambridge University Orchestra, continuing to play in several music societies.

Geoffrey Richardson took up the position as Principal of the newly named The Queen’s College, Glasgow, on 1 September 1976. He was the first male to take on the role at the College which had been led by women for over a century. He led the College through difficult times, upgrading the academic standards and modernising its organisational structure. He achieved this through a College Development Programme from 1977 to 1986, involving all staff in the process of change. During his time as Principal the College also expanded its syllabus and premises, including the provision of Social Work courses from 1976, the transfer of the physiotherapy schools from Greater Glasgow Health Board to the College in 1977, and the schools of the other allied health professions between 1984 and 1990. The College also achieved CNAA (Council for National Academic Awards) accreditation for its degrees and underwent an HMI (Her Majesty’s Inspectorate) inspection in May 1985. During this time Geoffrey Richardson studied towards a Doctorate in Education which he awarded by the University of Glasgow in 1980.

He resigned from the College, leaving in January 1991 to take up the position of Director of Roffey Park Management College in Sussex.

Rose, Henry Frances Aylward | b 1928 | Secretary and Treasurer of the Glasgow and West of Scotland College of Domestic Science

  • P0075
  • Person
  • b 1928

Henry Rose (known as Harry) was born on the 22nd of March 1928 and attended Rutherglen Academy from 1940 -1944. In July 1962 he became Chief Clerk of the Technical College, Coatbridge. He studied at the University of Glasgow from October 1965 to June 1968, qualifying with a Diploma in Public Administration. On 1 January 1969 Harry Rose took up the appointment of Senior Administrative Officer for the Glasgow and West of Scotland College of Domestic Science. He was married with a son and two daughters and had experience in general administration; finance; student records and examination arrangements; statistics and liaison work. He was appointed by Miss Calder after a Governor's meeting in June 1968 recognised that this role was needed in order to cater for the administration of the College. When Mr Mackenzie, the Secretary and Treasurer resigned on the 30th of June 1972, Harry Rose was appointed Secretary and Treasurer. With this title he became official correspondent for the College and the registered office of the College became 1 Park Drive. He was the first full-time member of College staff to hold the position of Secretary and Treasurer (previously the role had been carried out by partners of the Glasgow firm of solicitors, Hill and Hoggan). He was also the first man to become a full-time member of the College staff, apart from janitors and boilermen.
Mr Rose was an invaluable member of College staff supporting it through major changes. Juliann Calder’ successor as Principal, Geoffrey Richardson, brought a new style of management to the College as well as changes in organisational structure and staffing. Developments in further and higher education and the introduction of the Council for National Academic Awards (CNAA) also brought new standards and processes to be adhered to.
Harry Rose retired on 31st March 1989. A formal luncheon was held in his honour on 22 March 1989 at which he was presented with a video recorder and cheque.

Serote, Mongane Wally | b 1944 | poet

  • P0047
  • Person
  • b 1944

During apartheid Wally Serote was an ANC Cultural Attache and poet. He wrote the poem 'I Will Wait' and is know as one of the Soweto 'township' poets.

He is politically active and was held without trial in solitary confinement under the regime's Terrorism Act and, later exiled from his home country of South Africa after earning an MFA from Columbia University while on a Fulllbright scholarship.

He has won numerous awards and has served as a member of the South African Parliament.

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