Showing 219 results

names

End Loans to Southern Africa

  • C0028
  • Corporate body
  • 1974-1995

End Loans to Southern Africa (ELTSA) campaigned for the end to apartheid through the imposition of effective financial sanctions. It was established in 1974 by the Reverend David Haslam to campaign initially against loans by Midland Bank, together with other European banks, to the South African government through the European American Banking Corporation. It subsequently broadened its activities to campaign through consumer and shareholder action, parliamentary lobbying and other activities against all foreign, and particularly British, assistance to South Africa and for the implementation of the United Nations General Assembly resolution to end all new investment in and financial loans to South Africa. ELTSA carried out research into British banks and companies, produced information and campaigning documents and pioneered the techniques of pressure group shareholder action. A major element of its banks campaign was the boycott of Barclays Bank. In addition to the banking and disinvestment campaigns ELTSA was involved in the campaign to isolate South African gold through the World Gold Commission and through Embargo it supported the oil embargo of South Africa, with a particular focus during the late 1980s on the boycott of Shell.

In 1994 ELTSA was transformed into the Southern Africa Economic Research Unit (SAERU) to address the economic legacies of apartheid and encourage financial assistance to the region.

Esack, Farid | b. 1959 | Muslim scholar

  • P0051
  • Person
  • 1959

Dr Farid Esack has an international reputation as a Muslim scholar, speaker and human rights activist. He has lectured widely on religion and Islamic studies and also served as a Commissioner for Gender Equality with Nelson Mandela's government. He has authored numerous Islamic books and is currently the Visiting Professor of Islamic Studies at Harvard Divinity School.

Filling | Brian |b.1946 | Anti-Apartheid activist

  • P0002
  • Person
  • b. 1946

Brian Filling held several concurrent roles within the Scottish Committee for the Anti-Apartheid Movement, including: Scottish Committee Chair, Glasgow Group Committee Chair and Scottish Committee for Local Authority Action Against Apartheid Secretary.

Gibson, Isobel Scott | 1897-1993 |OBE JP, Principal of the Glasgow and West of Scotland College of Domestic Science

  • P0069
  • Person
  • 1897-1993

Isobel Scott Gibson was born in Glasgow in 1897, the daughter of George A Gibson, Professor of Mathematics at the University of Glasgow. Her father was involved with the Glasgow and West of Scotland College of Domestic Science as a Governor from session 1911/12 until his resignation in December 1925. He was also involved with the Board at Park School in Glasgow, joining in May 1915 and rising to Chairman of the Board of this prestigious girl's school in August 1917. Isobel Gibson also went on to become a member of the Board at Park School and a Director of the School Company.

Isobel Gibson was educated at the Park School, Glasgow, and then studied for a teaching diploma at the Glasgow and West of Scotland College of Domestic Science. In 1917 she left the College to work in the kitchens of the Erskine Hospital for limbless soldiers. She returned to the College 2 years later to complete her teacher training. In 1920 she took a one year course at the King's College of Household and Social Science in London. She returned to Glasgow in 1921 to teach at Park School. In 1927, at the age of 30 years, she entered the University of Glasgow to study for a BSc in Applied Science, specialising in chemistry and physiology.

After graduating in 1930, Isobel Gibson went to work in Edinburgh as a Superintendent of Domestic Subjects with the Education Authority. Promotion followed in 1937 to the general staff of the Scottish Education Department's Inspectorate and in 1944 she was again promoted to the rank of His Majesty's Inspectorate. In January 1947 she took up her new position of Principal at the Glasgow and West of Scotland College of Domestic Science. In June 1951 she was awarded an OBE in recognition of her work.

During her career she helped the College recover from the war and struggle through the period of scarcity and rationing. She encouraged the academic developments of the College and put much work into the establishment of a proper library at Park Drive. She also played an important role within the International Federation of Home Economics, being elected as its president in 1959. She was also a president of the Glasgow branch of the British Federation of University Women. She instigated the new student residences at Dorchester Avenue that were formally opened by the Queen in 1968. The residences were named Gibson Hall in recognition of her vital role.

After her retirement at the end of 1962, Isobel Gibson moved to Edinburgh to live. In May 1993, she died in a nursing home, aged 96 years.

Glaister, Isabella Scott Scoular |1879-1954 | Principal of the Glasgow and West of Scotland College of Domestic Science

  • P0073
  • Person
  • 1879-1954

Isabella Scott Glaister (known as Ella) was born in Glasgow in 1879. She was the eldest daughter of Professor John Glaister, Regius Professor of Forensic Medicine and Public Health at the University of Glasgow.
She took up the post of Superintendent and Office Secretary (later changed to Principal) of the Glasgow and West of Scotland College of Domestic Science in March 1908. The College had just been formed from the amalgamation of the Glasgow School of Cookery and West End School of Cookery. Ella Glaister had the difficult task of managing the merger at staff level and had to oversee the four College sites dispersed across Glasgow. During her time at the College she founded the “Glasgow Cookery Book”, originally a text book on cookery which was updated over the years by staff and eventually went into public circulation. The first edition was printed in 1910. She also attended meetings of the National Union for the Technical Education of Women in Domestic Subjects and of the Association of Superintendents of Recognised Training Schools in Domestic Subjects.
Ella Glaister resigned on 9 Sep 1910 to take up the post of Scotch Education Department Inspectress of Domestic Subjects. On 24 June 1919 in Melbourne, she married Professor Harold A Woodruff and her wedding cake was presented by the College. He was a professor of veterinary pathology and director of the veterinary institute at the University of Melbourne, a widower with two small sons. In Australia she continued her pioneering work in the field of domestic science education. She was a founder of the Australian Invergowrie Homecraft Hostel and was its chief examiner from 1928 to 1949. She was also a founder and councillor of the Emily McPherson College of Domestic Economy.
She died in Melbourne on 3 March 1954.

Glasgow Polytechnic

  • C0007
  • Corporate body
  • 1971-1993

Glasgow College of Technology was established in 1971, as a result of the merger of two proposed colleges of higher education, the College of Science and Technology and the College of Commerce (these proposed colleges were merged before the buildings were completed and the doors opened). In 1987 the Board of Governors agreed to change the name of the College to Glasgow College, mainly for advertising purposes, although for legal purposes the name remained Glasgow College of Technology. Several attempts were made to designate the College a polytechnic. It was proposed in 1971 and 1979 but it was not until 1 January 1991 that it became Glasgow Polytechnic. The new Polytechnic was officially launched on 1 May 1991. Following the Government’s White Paper ‘Higher Education: A New Framework’ in May 1991 the new institution saw their opportunity to become a University and to award their own degrees. Discussions were entered into with The Queen’s College, Glasgow with regards to a merger and the intention to merge was announced on 4 December 1991. In June 1992 Glasgow Polytechnic was granted full degree awarding powers and on 1 April 1993 it finally merged with The Queen’s College, Glasgow to form Glasgow Caledonian University. The institution’s premises were located on Cowcaddens Road, Glasgow in a purpose built complex, which at time of merger formed the main campus of Glasgow Caledonian University.

The original aim of the institution was to develop a higher level of academic training and to offer degrees validated by the Council for National Academic Awards (CNAA).

When Glasgow College of Technology opened in 1971, its syllabus was mainly made up of higher level transferred courses. Stow College of Engineering and The Central College of Commerce and Distribution were the two main institutions responsible for transferring teaching, and staff to these courses. Initially there were 12 departments at the new College, the flagship being the Optics Department. Others included Electrical Engineering, Mechanical and Civil Engineering, Biology, Computing, Mathematics, Physics, Chemistry, Business Administration, Law and Public Administration, Commerce, Management and Finance, Social Sciences and Humanities.

The first CNAA degree to be offered was in optics. Other courses on offer were diplomas and certificates validated by the Scottish Technical Education Council (SCOTEC) or the Scottish Business Education Council (SBEC). The Social Sciences and Humanities Departments both provided teaching towards London University degrees. The second CNAA degree was introduced in 1973, a BA in Social Sciences, and this was followed, in 1977, by a degree in nursing. A Department of Nursing Studies was established in 1980 and there was a clear commitment to development in this area.

In 1981 three faculties were established, Business and Administration Studies, Life and Social Sciences and Science and Engineering. This decade also saw a move to improve the standard of engineering education. By the early 1980s there was a CNAA validated BSc in Engineering and soon approval was given for a Bachelor of Engineering. The development of offering joint courses with neighbouring further education establishments also continued. In 1985 the full time courses on offer included 14 degrees, 12 higher diplomas and higher national diplomas. There were 7 other diplomas and professional courses such as those in nursing, over 50 part time courses, 2 of which were degrees - BSc in Mechanical Engineering and the BA in Social Sciences.

For session 1991/92 its student enrolment was 5,900 (FTE) and it was Scotland's second largest central institution. It was fully accredited for taught courses by the CNAA, offered SCOTVEC qualifications, and was committed to the principles of wider access and credit accumulation and transfer (CAT scheme). In June 1992 Glasgow Polytechnic was granted full degree awarding powers.

The College was established by Glasgow Corporation, which was its ultimate owner but did not play a direct role in its government. Although not a Scottish central institution until 1985, the Scottish Education Department (SED) had a much more direct bearing on the College’s academic life. The College's statutes corresponded fairly closely to the SED’s 1972 guidelines for the government of central institutions. The Board of Governors (Governing Council), in which originally the local authority was the predominant element, was responsible for the allocation of resources and staffing and the Academic Board dealt with the academic planning, implementation of quality control and academic affairs. In 1975 control of the College was transferred from Glasgow Corporation to the newly formed Strathclyde Regional Council. At this time the Governing Council became the College Council. In 1985 the College became a Scottish central institution and the College Council became the Governing Body. Although the composition and membership changed, the Governing Body and Academic Board remained in place until the merger with The Queen’s College, Glasgow.

The Directors/Principals of the College between 1971 and 1993 were Dr Reginald Beale 1971-1982; Dr Norman Meadows 1982-1988; and Dr J. S. Mason (Stan Mason) 1988-1993.

Glasgow School of Cookery | 1875-1908

  • C0111
  • Corporate body
  • 1875-1908

The Glasgow School of Cookery was established in 1875 and opened to the public on 21 February 1876. In 1908, the Glasgow School of Cookery amalgamated with the West End School of Cookery, Glasgow, to form a Scottish central institution called the Glasgow and West of Scotland College of Domestic Science (Incorporated), later named The Queen’s College, Glasgow.
A committee was appointed in 1875 to establish a Glasgow School of Cookery with the Rev Frederick Lockhart Robertson (1827-1892) of St Andrews Church, Glasgow, as the Convener and key instigator, and a number of prominent citizens as Directors. The aim of the school was to educate young working class women in culinary skills as a contribution to the improvement of family life among lower income groups. Funding to help establish the School was raised by public subscription and its first premises were opened at The Albert Hall, 285 Bath Street, Glasgow.
Grace Chalmers Paterson (1843-1925) was the first Principal of the School and driving force behind the Glasgow School of Cookery. She was an active campaigner for education and womens’ issues who fought to introduce cookery and domestic economy to the teaching curriculum of Scottish schools, and was one of the first two women elected to the Glasgow School Board in 1885. She was succeeded as Principal by Ella (Isabella Scott) Glaister (1879-1954) in March 1908, although she still remained active within the school until June of that year.
Initially the School offered classes in superior cookery, plain cookery and cookery for the working classes. Evening classes for working class women were subsidised by the daytime courses aimed at more affluent women but they were not well attended, despite eventually being offered for free. Emphasis changed to teaching of domestic subjects within the Board Schools and in taking classes out to towns and villages around Glasgow. In 1876, with a change in regulations allowing inclusion of cookery classes on School Board expenditure, the demand for teacher training increased and the School acquired further premises at 65 Greendyke Street and 151 George Street, Glasgow. That year the Glasgow School, along with representatives from Edinburgh, Scotland; Liverpool and Leeds, England, formed themselves into the Northern Union of Training Schools of Cookery to institute uniform standards and common examinations for teachers of cookery. This body became known as The National Council for Domestic Studies and all the schools initially involved were subsequently recognised as training centres by the education departments.
In 1888, the Glasgow School of Cookery managed a tearoom at the Glasgow International Exhibition (2 May 1888-10 November 1888) which provided enough profits to help with the running of the school for some years to come. New premises were leased that year at 86 Bath Street, the adjacent premises in 1899 and later premises at 504 Sauchiehall Street and 1 Victoria Crescent, Glasgow.
Over time the syllabus also expanded to include teachers’ diplomas in cookery, laundry, housewifery, dressmaking, needlework and millinery, along with certificates in high-class cookery, professional cookery and housewifery.
Prior to amalgamation in 1908 the School was known as the Glasgow Training School of Cookery and Domestic Economy.

Goldberg | Denis |b.1933 |Anti-Apartheid activist

  • P0010
  • Person
  • b. 1933

Goldberg was an engineer and political activist born in Cape Town, South Africa. He became one of the Rivonia trialists and was detained in 1963 for over 22 years until his release in 1985.

Goldberg was an Executive member of the Congress of Democrats, an organisation allied to the ANC in the Congress Alliance from the mid-1950s. After the first non racial elections in 1994 Goldberg founded the development organisation Community H.E.A.R.T. in London to help to improve living standards of black South Africans.

His work against the apartheid regime was tireless and he traveled the world on speaking tours as a spokes person for the ANC and representing the Anti-Apartheid Committee of the United Nations, visiting Scotland alongside other places. He gained the Albert Luthuli Peace Prize in recognition of his efforts.

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