Showing 222 results

names

Glasgow School of Cookery | 1875-1908

  • C0111
  • Corporate body
  • 1875-1908

The Glasgow School of Cookery was established in 1875 and opened to the public on 21 February 1876. In 1908, the Glasgow School of Cookery amalgamated with the West End School of Cookery, Glasgow, to form a Scottish central institution called the Glasgow and West of Scotland College of Domestic Science (Incorporated), later named The Queen’s College, Glasgow.
A committee was appointed in 1875 to establish a Glasgow School of Cookery with the Rev Frederick Lockhart Robertson (1827-1892) of St Andrews Church, Glasgow, as the Convener and key instigator, and a number of prominent citizens as Directors. The aim of the school was to educate young working class women in culinary skills as a contribution to the improvement of family life among lower income groups. Funding to help establish the School was raised by public subscription and its first premises were opened at The Albert Hall, 285 Bath Street, Glasgow.
Grace Chalmers Paterson (1843-1925) was the first Principal of the School and driving force behind the Glasgow School of Cookery. She was an active campaigner for education and womens’ issues who fought to introduce cookery and domestic economy to the teaching curriculum of Scottish schools, and was one of the first two women elected to the Glasgow School Board in 1885. She was succeeded as Principal by Ella (Isabella Scott) Glaister (1879-1954) in March 1908, although she still remained active within the school until June of that year.
Initially the School offered classes in superior cookery, plain cookery and cookery for the working classes. Evening classes for working class women were subsidised by the daytime courses aimed at more affluent women but they were not well attended, despite eventually being offered for free. Emphasis changed to teaching of domestic subjects within the Board Schools and in taking classes out to towns and villages around Glasgow. In 1876, with a change in regulations allowing inclusion of cookery classes on School Board expenditure, the demand for teacher training increased and the School acquired further premises at 65 Greendyke Street and 151 George Street, Glasgow. That year the Glasgow School, along with representatives from Edinburgh, Scotland; Liverpool and Leeds, England, formed themselves into the Northern Union of Training Schools of Cookery to institute uniform standards and common examinations for teachers of cookery. This body became known as The National Council for Domestic Studies and all the schools initially involved were subsequently recognised as training centres by the education departments.
In 1888, the Glasgow School of Cookery managed a tearoom at the Glasgow International Exhibition (2 May 1888-10 November 1888) which provided enough profits to help with the running of the school for some years to come. New premises were leased that year at 86 Bath Street, the adjacent premises in 1899 and later premises at 504 Sauchiehall Street and 1 Victoria Crescent, Glasgow.
Over time the syllabus also expanded to include teachers’ diplomas in cookery, laundry, housewifery, dressmaking, needlework and millinery, along with certificates in high-class cookery, professional cookery and housewifery.
Prior to amalgamation in 1908 the School was known as the Glasgow Training School of Cookery and Domestic Economy.

Goldberg | Denis |b.1933 |Anti-Apartheid activist

  • P0010
  • Person
  • b. 1933

Goldberg was an engineer and political activist born in Cape Town, South Africa. He became one of the Rivonia trialists and was detained in 1963 for over 22 years until his release in 1985.

Goldberg was an Executive member of the Congress of Democrats, an organisation allied to the ANC in the Congress Alliance from the mid-1950s. After the first non racial elections in 1994 Goldberg founded the development organisation Community H.E.A.R.T. in London to help to improve living standards of black South Africans.

His work against the apartheid regime was tireless and he traveled the world on speaking tours as a spokes person for the ANC and representing the Anti-Apartheid Committee of the United Nations, visiting Scotland alongside other places. He gained the Albert Luthuli Peace Prize in recognition of his efforts.

Grant | Bernie |1944-2000 |politician

  • P0011
  • Person
  • 1944-2000

Grant was a Guyanese Labour MP for Tottenham between 1987-2000 with a left-wing trade union background, he was also an anti-apartheid campaigner, a supporter of revolutionary governments, feminist causes, black studies and a multi-racial school curriculum.

He studied mining engineering at Heriot Watt University in Edinburgh and was later involved with the work of the SC AAM, speaking at the Glasgow Green Rally of 11th June 1988, which was followed by a march to London as part of the Freedom at 70 campaign.

Gray | Robert |1928-2008 |Lord Provost of Glasgow

  • P0013
  • Person
  • 1928-2008

Gray was a tireless campaigner on behalf of Glasgow, serving as a Councillor before rising to become Lord Provost of Glasgow (1984-88), succeeding Michael Kelly.

He was one of the pioneers of the Garden Festival in 1988 and European City of Culture in 1990 – both of which did much to regenerate the concept of the city in Scotland and, indeed, throughout Europe. Gray campaigned for these events in Glasgow, and their undoubted success is a fitting testimonial to a proud Glaswegian.

During his time in the position he led a deputation of civic leaders to 10 Downing Street on the 21st anniversary of the life-sentencing of Mandela in 1985, he was also instrumental in renaming the St George's Place Nelson Mandela Place in 1986.

Gray |Alasdair | b.1932 | author

  • P0012
  • Person
  • b.1934

Gray describes himself as a 'maker of imagined objects' and produces novels, short stories, plays, poems, pamphlets and literary criticism. He is also an accomplished artist who has painted remarkable murals and is the designer and illustrator of his own books and those of other writers.

During the campaign of the SC AAM, Gray performed readings at special events held at Moir Hall in aid of the cause.

Gulf Oil LP

  • C0105
  • Corporate body
  • 1901-1984

Gulf Oil was a major global oil company from the 1900s to the 1980s. The eighth-largest American manufacturing company in 1941 and the ninth-largest in 1979, Gulf Oil was one of the so-called Seven Sisters oil companies.

Haslemere Group

  • C0097
  • Corporate body
  • 1968-c.1977

The Haslemere Group was formed in 1968 to discuss the social and economic crisis facing the developing countries, the failure of the rich industrialized countries such as Britain to recognize their responsibility for the crisis, and the urgent need to draw effective public attention to those issues. Members of the Haslemere Group researched and published information on Barclays Bank's operation in apartheid South Africa. The Haslemere Group researched and published information on the supply of oil to Rhodesia (Zimbabwe) and the role of oil companies including Mobil Oil, Caltex, Shell and British Petroleum (BP). In 1977 the Haslemere Group, Namibian Support Committee, the Anti-Apartheid Movement initiated the Campaign Against Namibian Uranium Contracts.

Heath | Sir Edward |1916-2005 | Former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom

  • P0060
  • Person
  • 1916-2005

Heath was British Conservative prime minister from 1970 to 1974, a troubled period which came to be seen as reflecting the failure of post-war consensual Conservatism, and produced a backlash in his party that brought Margaret Thatcher to the leadership in 1975.

As prime minister, Heath's policies seemed muddled. His only clear success was in fulfilling his long-held ambition of taking Britain into the European Community, in 1973. He preserved the consensual and moderate policies of his 1950s predecessors, but he also felt obliged to restrain public expenditure through deflationary policies, and to tackle increasing labour unrest by trying to reduce the power of trade unions. When faced with the muscle of the militant miners' union, however, Heath backed down, executing a 'u-turn' for which the Conservative Party's right wing never forgave him. Mass strikes continued, in parallel with ongoing violence in Northern Ireland. The 1974 General Election was inconclusive and Heath resigned as prime minister, to be replaced by Harold Wilson and a minority Labour government. The following year Thatcher replaced Heath as Conservative leader.

Heath remained in parliament until 2001, a constant reminder to Thatcher of the party's moderate and Europhile traditions, which Heath angrily believed she had betrayed. He died on 17 July 2005.

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