Showing 276 results

names

Phillips, John Clifford | b 1943 | Principal of The Queen's College, Glasgow

  • P0072
  • Person
  • b 1943

John Clifford Phillips was born in Dyfed, Wales, on 29 January 1943. He attended Llandeilo Grammar School before studying Mathematics at Aberystwyth University and graduating with a BSc in 1964.

He started his career as an engineering mathematician, later becoming a specialist in systems development. After graduating he carried out research at the Mathematics Department of the University of Glasgow. During this period he met his wife, Anne Margaret and they were married in 1967. That same year he took up a position as lecturer at Lancashire Polytechnic. After 2 years he moved to Leeds Polytechnic where he remained until 1990. Initially employed as lecturer he had a series of promotions, eventually becoming Head of the School of Mathematics and Computing in 1986 and then Dean for the Faculty of Engineering and Computing in 1987. His final post at the Polytechnic, between 1988 and 1990, was as Senior, Executive, External Development. He was responsible for the Polytechnic’s external income generation work and undertook consultancy work in Brunei, Guyana, Tanzania, Hong Kong and China, mainly in training needs analysis and institutional management. After leaving Leeds Polytechnic he worked as a freelance consultant before taking on the role of Principal of The Queen’s College, Glasgow, in February 1991.

His management experience equipped him to lead the College through a difficult period of uncertainty culminating in merger with Glasgow Polytechnic in 1993 to become Glasgow Caledonian University. John Phillips was appointed Vice-Principal of the new University.

Richardson, Geoffrey Alan | b 1936 | Principal of The Queen's College, Glasgow

  • P0071
  • Person
  • b 1936

Geoffrey Alan Richardson was born in Lancashire on 27 July 1936. He graduated with an MA (Hons) in Geography from Fitzwilliam College, Cambridge in 1958. He went on to gain his teaching certificate from Exeter University in 1959, before beginning his career as a geography teacher.

He taught in primary and secondary schools in England and Australia, where he and his wife lived for 3 years. On their return to England he became a senior tutor in Ilkley College of Education, Yorkshire and his career interests developed into education management. He was awarded a diploma in Education Management from Sheffield Polytechnic in 1973. His role at the College included teaching students of environmental studies, home economics, professional studies and teaching practice as well as having overall responsibility for student welfare in the College and for a hall of residence. He was involved in education management developments at the College and began research on a part-time basis at the University of Manchester towards a masters degree in Education. He also wrote several geography textbooks at this time. He was a man of wide interests, he fished, ran 3 miles every morning and had been principal clarinettist in the Cambridge University Orchestra, continuing to play in several music societies.

Geoffrey Richardson took up the position as Principal of the newly named The Queen’s College, Glasgow, on 1 September 1976. He was the first male to take on the role at the College which had been led by women for over a century. He led the College through difficult times, upgrading the academic standards and modernising its organisational structure. He achieved this through a College Development Programme from 1977 to 1986, involving all staff in the process of change. During his time as Principal the College also expanded its syllabus and premises, including the provision of Social Work courses from 1976, the transfer of the physiotherapy schools from Greater Glasgow Health Board to the College in 1977, and the schools of the other allied health professions between 1984 and 1990. The College also achieved CNAA (Council for National Academic Awards) accreditation for its degrees and underwent an HMI (Her Majesty’s Inspectorate) inspection in May 1985. During this time Geoffrey Richardson studied towards a Doctorate in Education which he awarded by the University of Glasgow in 1980.

He resigned from the College, leaving in January 1991 to take up the position of Director of Roffey Park Management College in Sussex.

MacKirdy, Mary | 1874–1957 | Principal of the West End School of Cookery, Glasgow

  • P0067
  • Person
  • 1874–1957

Mary MacKirdy, was the niece of Mrs Margaret Black, founder of the West End School of Cookery. She was born on the 11th May 1874 and achieved her diploma from the West End School in September 1894, with both the Scotch Education Department and the Glasgow School Board granting assessments for her training. She taught cookery at the West End School of Cookery from 1895, becoming its Principal on Margaret Black’s death in 1903.

When the West End School of Cookery amalgamated with the Glasgow School of Cookery in 1908, to form The Glasgow and West of Scotland College of Domestic Science, the Miss Ella Glaister became Principal, however Mary MacKirdy remained as part of the teaching staff. She was a head teacher in cookery, specialising in the Article 55 students, the Provincial Committee students who were supplementing their elementary teaching qualification. She kept abreast of the growing subject of Domestic Science, on the whole, and gave well attended public lectures and worked with Ministry of Labour classes. She was a published writer of articles and books on cookery including the College publication "Recipes for You".

Her younger sister Miss Janet MacKirdy was also on the teaching staff and they both shared a house, first at 191 Renfrew Street, then latterly at 9 Park Quadrant. In June and July of 1926 Mary was granted two months leave of absence to visit the United States and Canada, with a view to furthering her knowledge by visiting schools and colleges in these countries. Janet was also granted one months’ leave, June, to travel with her sister and her remit was labour saving and modern household devices.

Mary MacKirdy was made a Fellow of the Educational Institute of Scotlandin 1935. She resigned from the College on the 9th of September 1937, after 42 years of service. On leaving she wasthe longest serving member of staff. She went on to become a Nutrition Supervisor for the Community Service in Scotland at the age of 63 years. A College prize, in appreciation of her work and service was given in her name for Article 55 students. This was presented by Mrs Black, of Kirkcaldy, who had previously given the Mrs Margaret Black Memorial Prize in 1925. The prize was first presented in 1938.

Mary MacKirdy was very much involved with the Bridgeton's Women's Institution, holding the position of Convener, and devoting much of her time to settlement and club work in Bridgeton. When this organisation ceased to function a gift of £200 from it's remaining funds was gifted to the College in December 1950. This money was used for educational purposes in the field of social sciences and was known as the Bridgeton's Women's Institution Fund.

Mary MacKirdy died in 1957.

Scottish Education Department | 1872-1999

  • C0113
  • Corporate body
  • 1872-1999

The Scottish Education Department (SED) came into being as the body responsible for schooling in Scotland when it was formed from the Church of Scotland's Board of Education for Scotland in 1872.

The Education (Scotland) Act 1872 made education compulsory and took over the running of schools from the Church of Scotland. Burgh as well as parish schools now came under School Boards run by local committees. It was originally called the Scotch Education Department, was a committee of the Privy Council of the United Kingdom, and had its offices in London. In 1885 the department became a responsibility of the new ministerial post of Secretary for Scotland, under whom the Scottish Office was set up in Dover House, Whitehall, London.
In 1918 the department was moved to Edinburgh and the name was changed to the Scottish Education Department, in accordance with Scottish usage. The Secretary for Scotland became the Secretary of State for Scotland in 1926. The department was renamed the Scottish Office Education Department (SOED) in 1991, and the Scottish Office Education and Industry Department (SOEID) in 1995.

With devolution in 1999 the new Scottish Executive set up the Scottish Executive Education Department (SEED) to oversee school education whilst the Scottish Executive Enterprise and Lifelong Learning Department – now Enterprise Transport and Lifelong Learning Department (ETLLD) – took over responsibility from the former SED for further and higher education.

Queen’s College, Glasgow | Research and Staff Development Committee |1980-1993

  • C0119
  • Corporate body
  • 1980-1993

The Research and Staff Development Committee was set up as a Standing Committee by the Academic Council in 1980. it was responsible for reviewing the expertise of staff in light of any changes in the academic work of the college. It would make recommendations regarding staff development to the Academic Council to ensure the skillset would be able to meet future development plans. The committee would arrange appropriate in-service training and create an environment to encourage staff research and development activities. The Committee would advise on the development of research activities that were worthy of support by the College.

Membership was as follows: Principal; Vice-Principal; Secretary and Treasurer; Heads and Associate Heads of Departments; Senior Librarian; Senior Lecturer, Learning Resources Centre; up to five other members elected from the academic staff, up to two members, with appropriate experience, from outwith the College; one student representative appointed by the Student Representative Council. The Academic Council elected the Chair of the Committee who would serve no longer than three years. Appointed members would serve for not more than two years but could be re-appointed without a break in service. Appointments were made in September unless a vacancy occurred.

Queen’s College, Glasgow | Academic and Professional Standards Committee | 1990-1993

  • C0120
  • Corporate body
  • 1990-1993

The Academic and Professional Standards Committee was formed following the introduction of the Central Institutions (Scotland) Regulations (1988) the Governing Body when the academic structure of the College was re-organised into faculties. It was responsible for the maintenance and enhancement of academic standards on courses being offered by the College and examining the feasibility of proposals for new courses in terms of academic content, physical resources and staffing. It oversaw the work of the Validation Panels and Credit Accumulation and Transfer Sub-committee and was responsible for monitoring the appointment of external assessors by the Faculties.
Membership included Principal; Vice-Principal; Deans of Faculty; Head of Quality Assurance Unit; 4 Course Leaders (2 nominated by each faculty); 4 Teaching staff (2 elected from each faculty); 1 representative of the Academic Council; 2 Student members appointed by the Student Representative Council; co-opted members as required.

Queen’s College, Glasgow | Central Academic Services Committee | 1983-1991

  • C0118
  • Corporate body
  • 1983-1991

The Central Academic Services Committee was set up by the Academic Council in September 1982, mainly as a response to comments made in the Institutional Review Report. It's role was to advise the Academic Council on policy issues related to the development of the Library, Learning Resources Centre, Computer Centre, non specialist teaching rooms and the Student Advisory Centre. It oversaw the work of the sub-committees and working groups relating to the services serving the academic sectors of the College.

It's members included the Principal; Vice-principal; Secretary and Treasurer; Director, Computer Centre; Senior Lecturer, Learning Resources Centre; Chief Librarian; Student Counsellor; four elected members of the academic staff; two representatives of the technical and administrative staff; two student members.

The sub-committees included:
-Library sub-committee
-Learning Resources sub-committee
-Computer Services sub-committee
The first meeting of the Committee was held on 15 February 1983.

Queen’s College, Glasgow | Course Development Committee | 1980-1990

  • C0117
  • Corporate body
  • 1980-1990

The Course Development, Validating and Monitoring Committee (shortened to Course Development Committee in 1982) was a Standing Committee of the Academic Council. It was responsible for encouraging the development of new courses, examining the feasibility of proposed courses and appointing a Course Planning Committee responsible for developing adopted courses. Each stage of course planning and validation had to be approved by the Committee and it was also responsible for monitoring progress of existing courses.

Membership was as follows: Principal; Vice-Principal; Secretary and Treasurer; Heads and Associate Heads of Departments; Senior Librarian; Senior lecturer, Learning Resources Centre; up to five other members elected from the academic staff, up to four members, with appropriate experience, from outwith the College; one student representative appointed by the Student Representative Council. The Academic Council elected the Chair of the Committee who would serve no longer than three years. Appointed members would serve for not more than two years but could be re-appointed without a break in service. Appointments were made in September unless a vacancy occurred.

Queen’s College, Glasgow | Governing Body | 1908-1993

  • C0115
  • Corporate body
  • 1908-1993

The Governing Body managed the business of the Association. The first Governing Body was a Board of Governors made up of 27 members elected and approved by the Association at the Annual General Meeting. Nine women and twelve men were elected from the Association and another six were nominated members, representatives from local School Boards, Councils and The Merchants House of Glasgow.
The Governors held office for 3 years on a rotational basis where one third of them would retire from office each year. General Meetings of the Governors were held 4 times a year and the Chairman of the Governors was elected at the December meeting. The Chairman would hold office for 1 year but could be re-elected without a break in service.

Chairmen of the Board of Governors of the College:
-Dr Paul Rottenberg, 1908-1915
-Sir Samuel Chisholm, 1915-1923
-Sir Andrew Hislop Pettigrew, 1924-1942
-Mr Osbourne R Hatrick, 1942-1946
-Mr John F Carson, 1946-1953
-Mr A I MacKenzie, 1953-1965
-Mrs Margaret B Cross, 1965-1968
-Mrs Barbara H Quaile, 1968-1971
-Mr George C Parker, 1971-1980
-Ian Hutchison, 1980-1988
-Eric Miller, 1989-1990
-Celia Urquhart-Logie, 1990-1993

The Governors dealt with the affairs of the College through a series of appointed Committees, each managing different aspects of the work of the College. At the Governors’ meetings the minutes of all the appointed Committees which had met since the last Governors meeting were discussed, along with finance and any other business relating to the College. The membership of each committee was confirmed and listed in the minutes of the Governors’ meeting following the Annual General Meeting (AGM) of the Association.

The first committees were: Governors; Property and Finance; Housewifery; Cookery; Laundry and Dressmaking; and Educational Methods. Some of the committees also had sub-committees and special sub-committees could be formed to deal with particular tasks. In 1912 a Buildings Committee was introduced to manage the building of new premises at Park Drive. This was disbanded in 1919 but re-instated in 1934 to manage the building of the extension at Park Drive. In the 1930s the Playing Fields and Science committees were established. The arrival of a new Principal, Isobel Gibson, in 1947 brought new ideas and retirement of staff members initiated a re-organisation of staff and the administration structure. The Cookery Committee, Housewifery Committee, Laundry and Dressmaking committee and their respective sub-committees were abolished and replaced by a Technical Committee. At this time a Hostels committee was also established to manage the student residences.

By January 1960 Educational Methods Committee and Science committee were abolished, although the Committees had not sat for some time before that. In 1969 the committees changed again with Governors; Educational and Technical; Hostels and Student Welfare; Buildings and Property; Conditions of Service replacing previous committees.

In 1972 an Academic Council was instituted according to the terms of the Central Institutions (Scotland) Regulations (1972). The Academic Council discharged the functions of the Governing Body relating to the overall planning, coordination, development and supervision of the academic work of the College. The Academic Council met for the first time on 20 Feb 1973.

When the Central Institutions (Scotland) Amendment Regulations 1974 were introduced the Board of Governors was replaced by a Governing Body. It had its first meeting on 26 June 1974. There were thirty Governors in total: Principal, Vice-Principal; President of the Student Representative Council (SRC); six elected by and from the Members of the Association; seventeen appointed Governors (two appointed by the Secretary of State) from Local Authority Councils, Academic Institutions, Business Associations, SRC, etc; four co-opted by the Governors. When the Local Authorities merged to form Strathclyde Regional Council in 1976 the representation of local authorities on the Governing Body decreased, giving it a greater emphasis on the business community and student employers. Other Committees were introduced in the 1970s including: Social and Recreational; Publicity; Centenary Celebrations.

In 1980 a Staffing Committee and Finance and General Purposes Committee were formed. Following the introduction of the Central Institutions (Scotland) Regulations 1988 a new Governing Body was structure was brought in, reducing the number of Governors. The new Governing Body met for the first time in January 1989. When the College merged with Glasgow Polytechnic in 1993 to become Glasgow Caledonian University all the committees were disbanded. The final meeting of the Governing Body was held on 25 March 1993 and to mark the occasion a formal dinner was held afterwards in the Park View Suite (the College’s hospitality suite). Each of the Governors were presented with an individually engraved Royal Stuart bowl.

The main appointed committees and dates they served:
-Governors – 1907-1974, Governing Body – 1975-1993
-Property and Finance – 1909-1969, Finance – 1969-1979, Finance and General Purposes – 1969-1993
-Housewifery – 1909-1948
-Cookery – 1909-1948
-Laundry and Dressmaking – 1909-1948
-Educational Methods – 1909-1959 (although this committee is listed in the Governors’ minutes there were no minutes for this committee after 1948).
-Building – 1912-1919, 1934-1937, Buildings and Property – 1969-1988
-Science – 1936-1959 (although this committee is listed in the Governors’ minutes there were no minutes for this committee after 1948).
-Playing Fields – 1939-1968, Social and Recreational – 1973-1976
-Technical – 1949-1968, Education and Technical – 1969-1977
-Hostels – 1949-1968, Hostels and Student Welfare – 1969-1988, Student Affairs 1990-1992
-Conditions of Service – 1969-1980, Staffing – 1980-1993
-Centenary Celebrations – 1974
-Publicity - 1975

Queen’s College, Glasgow | Association | 1908-1993

  • C0114
  • Corporate body
  • 1908-1993

When the Glasgow School of Cookery was amalgamating with the West End School of Cookery to become one institution, it was decided to set up an Association in order to resolve disputes about representation on the new Board of Governors. A meeting was held on 19 December 1907 to launch the new Association and adopt the Articles of Association which had been framed by the two schools and approved by the Scotch Education Department. The Association was named The Glasgow and West of Scotland College of Domestic Science and was incorporated under the Companies Acts 1862 to 1900 as an Association limited by Guarantee.

The Association was formed of up to 500 subscribed members, who were responsible for the election of a governing body. Initially there were 247 subscribers who paid the fee of £1: 1s to become registered members of the Association. The Memorandum and Articles of Association cite Dr P Rottenburg, Mr T F Donald, Mr G B Hoggan, Miss I Gray, Mrs M Cowan, Miss E Donnal, Miss A McCall Anderson, Mr A C Scott and Mr H Carvick Webster as witnesses on 14 May 1908. Interested potential members were required to write a letter of application and pay the membership fee. New members were read out at the Governors’ meetings for approval. By 1975 the membership fee was £1.05 and by 1980 a membership application form had to be completed with payment of the fee. These applications were considered at the Annual General Meeting (AGM) when current members would elect the new members.

The business of the Association was managed by a Governing Body. Ordinary (or Annual) General Meetings of the Association were held once a year when the Treasurer’s Accounts and Report of the Governing Body were presented to the members. Elections were held to select Governors to replace those at the end of their rotation, re-elect the Auditor and approve new members. Any other important business relating to the College was also dealt with at the meeting. The Chairman of the Governors presided as chair at the meetings of the Association. The AGM was held in December/January until 1962 when it moved to April/May. Extraordinary General Meetings could be called at any time when the Association was required to make decisions on major issues concerning the College. The Secretary and Treasurer of the College was responsible for the administration of the Association.

The Association had a Common Seal which was used on official documents. These also had to be signed by the College Secretary and at least two of the Governors on behalf of the Association.

Results 71 to 80 of 276