Showing 222 results

names

Henderson | Hamish |1919-2002 |poet

  • P0014
  • Person
  • 1919-2002

Hamish Henderson is seen as the founding father of Scotland's twentieth century folk renaissance. He was passionate about politics and poetry, serving in the WWII and being inspired by the ballads of the soldiers and the song making of the Italian partisans. Henderson himself rejected modernist concepts of poetry and of being a poet. He collected, translated, composed and created in a wide variety of poetic and lyric forms.

Hamish Henderson was to exhibit the same capacity to combine occasion, craft and popular impact with 'Rivonia', which became an anthem of the South African anti-apartheid movement, which was set to the tune of a famous Spanish civil war song. The song was given the ANC's blessing and Henderson sang it on stage when Mandela visited Glasgow in 1993.

Heriot-Watt University

  • C0047
  • Corporate body
  • 1821 - present

Originating from the School of Arts of Edinburgh, founded in 1821 as the world's first Mechanics Institute, Heriot-Watt is one of the oldest higher education institutions in the UK. Celebrating our 50th anniversary, we gained university status by Royal Charter in 1966.

Heriot-Watt University has established a reputation for world-class teaching and practical, leading-edge research, which has made us one of the top UK universities for business and industry.

Hill and Hoggan, Solicitors, Glasgow | early 18th century-1971

  • C0121
  • Corporate body
  • early 18th century-1971

Hill and Hoggan were solicitors in Glasgow from the early eighteenth century. Mr George B Hoggan, who was a Partner in the firm, acted as Secretary to the Glasgow School of Cookery from the time of its commencement in 1874. In 1908, when it amalgamated with the West End School of Cookery, to become the Glasgow and West of Scotland College of Domestic Science (Incorporated), Mr Hoggan became a Governor of the College. From that time there was a succession of four Secretaries of the College, all of them partners in Hill and Hoggan:

Dr James A McCallum (d 1948), Secretary and Treasurer, 1908-1921; Joint Secretary and Treasurer, 1921-1928
Mr Andrew MacNair (d 1933), Joint Secretary and Treasurer, 1921-1928; Secretary and Treasurer, 1928-1933
Mr T L Grahame Reid (d 1969), Secretary and Treasurer, 1933-1969
Mr James D MacKenzie, Secretary and Treasurer, 1969-1972

Dr McCallum did a lot of work to raise the funds to build the new College premises in Park Drive and offered guidance in the move to the new building. He was dedicated to College affairs during his years of office. Due to illness, another partner, Andrew McNair was appointed as Joint Secretary, becoming sole Secretary when Dr McCallum resigned in December 1928. When Andrew McNair died in 1933 he was succeeded by TL Grahame Reid who died in 1969 and was replaced by James D Mackenzie.

Hill & Hoggan combined with the firm Mitchells Johnston and Company on 1 January 1972. The new firm of Mitchell Johnston Hill and Hoggan continued to administer the legal affairs of the College. On 1 January 1985 the firm merged with Mackenzie Roberton and Company to become Mitchells Roberton.

Hobbs, Alexander | b 1937 | political activist

  • P0062
  • Person
  • b. 1937

Alexander Hobbs, or Sandy as he is known, was born in Aberdeen, Scotland in 1937. From 1954 to 1958 he studied psychology at the University of Aberdeen. Although not an actively political student he was a member of a small informal circle who saw socialism, humanism and science as intimately linked and around this time became a member of the Aberdeen Humanist Group.

After graduating in 1958 he continued at the University as a postgraduate although he never completed his PhD. As a postgraduate he became heavily involved in political and cultural activities, becoming the first secretary of Aberdeen Left Club. The Chair of the Club was Ken Alexander. Through his activity in the New Left, Sandy became friendly with a number of ex-communists, including Norman and Janey Buchan. In the run-up to the 1959 General Election Sandy worked nearly full-time for the South Aberdeen Labour candidate and joined the party, remaining a member for 12 years. He was also an “outside” member of the Fife Socialist League. Around this time the Labour Party founded the Young Socialists and Sandy’s political activities focused on this part of the Labour Party until he left Aberdeen in 1961.

In 1961 Sandy married a fellow student, Lois Kemp, a leading member of the student CND and daughter of Labour Party activist William Kemp. Through his association with the Young Socialists, Sandy came into contact with various Trotskyist groups who were working within the Labour Party at the time. As a result he became close to the Labour Worker group but was not a member. He joined the Dundee Left Club but became more active in the CND, especially in publicising Scottish CND. In CND he worked closely with the cartoonist Leo Baxendale, which led to his also scriptwriting for Leo's comic, Wham!"

In 1965 Sandy moved to Glasgow becoming more involved in the Labour Party, chairing his local branch and acting as Janey Buchan's campaign manager for a local government election. He was again involved in the election campaigns for the 1970 General Election after which time he resigned from the Labour Party, having become disillusioned by Harold Wilson’s government. At this time a number of single-issue campaigns were gaining in prominence and Sandy became involved with the Campaign Against Racial Discrimination (CARD) and the Glasgow Committee Against Racism.

In 1968 Sandy started as a lecturer at Edinburgh College of Commerce where he chaired the Staff Association. In 1969 he moved to Jordanhill College of Education, Glasgow, where he was involved in the Association of Lecturers in Colleges of Education in Scotland (ALCES). A further move to Paisley College, Renfrewshire, Scotland, (now University of the West of Scotland) in 1975 resulted in his membership of the Association of Lecturers in Scottish Central Institutions (ALSCI).

Upon leaving the Labour Party, Sandy became attached to the International Socialists, who later became the Socialist Workers Party. He was never comfortable with the group and left a few years later in part because he found it much more congenial working on the less sectarian radical paper, Glasgow News. He also became involved with the Chilean
Committee for Human Rights supporting refugees from the regime of Pinochet. For a time, he re-joined the Labour Party again as a way of forwarding the work of this Committee.
From the mid-1970s onwards Sandy dropped out of active politics while his wife, Lois, continued to play an active part in the Women’s Movement and Glasgow Women’s Aid. Instead, he concentrated on research, writing and publishing as a lecturer within the Department of Applied Social Sciences at the University of Paisley and qualifying as a Chartered Psychologist which he achieved in 1990. In 1997, he became a Reader at the University of Paisley (University of the West of Scotland) and in 2002 became an Honorary Research Fellow concentrating on child labour and contemporary legends. In 2011, in collaboration with Willie Thompson, Sandy published the book, Out of the Burning House, which contains accounts of their political activities in the 1950s and early 1960s.

Hodge, David | c. 1909-1991 | former Lord Provost of Glasgow

  • P0062
  • Person
  • c. 1909-1991

David Hodge first served on Glasgow Corporation in 1971 and was chairman of the magistrates committee, becoming chairman of the licensing committee after local government reorganisation in 1974. He was chairman of Glasgow Constituency Labour Party and secretary of the Labour group on the council before becoming Lord Provost from May 1977 to 1980. The Labour whip was withdrawn from him after he entertained the South African ambassador to lunch at the City Chambers.

Huddleston| Trevor|1913-1998| Archbishop of the Church of the Province of the Indian Ocean

  • P0016
  • Person
  • 1913-1998

Born in England, Huddleston studied at Christ Church, Oxford University (1927-1931) before enrolling at Wells Theological College, taking his vows in 1941. He then ministered in townships in South Africa between 1943 and 1956. During the following years he became involved in protests alongside Nelson Mandela and continued to campaign and speak out against the apartheid regime after this, gaining awards from the ANC among others for his work.

In 1959 he addressed the founding meeting of the Anti-Apartheid Movement in London and in 1961 he was appointed Vice-President of the AAM, a position he held until 1981.

Huddelston often visited Scotland and was involved in key events in the SC AAM campaign, including: speaking at the 1988 Glasgow Green rally that was followed by a march down to London as part of the Freedom at 70 campaign, presenting Indres Naidoo with a giant key to symbolically open Mandela's cell door at the same rally, and speaking at the Sechaba Conference in Glasgow in 1990.

Hughes|Robert| b.1932 |Lord Hughes of Woodside

  • P0017
  • Person
  • b. 1932

Hughes is a British Labour politician and was chairman of the British Anti-Apartheid Movement from 1976 to 1995 when it was disbanded. Educated in Scotland at Robert Gordon University Aberdeen, he went on to work as a draughtsman in South Africa between 1947-1954. Hughes later became the first chairperson of the successor organisation Action for Southern Africa (ACTSA).

Key involvement with SC AAM events included: speaking at the SC AAM Conference in 1978, and speaking at the NALA event which Mandela also spoke at while in Glasgow collecting the Freedom of the Nine Cities in 1993.

Inland Revenue Staff Federation

  • C0106
  • Corporate body
  • 1892-1996

The Association of Tax Clerks was founded in 1892 and became the Association of Officers of Taxes in 1922. In 1936 the Association of Officers of Taxes joined with the National Association of Assessors and Collectors of Taxes and the Valuation Office Clerical Association to form the Inland Revenue Staff Federation. The Inland Revenue Minor Establishments' Association joined the Federation in 1938. The IRSF functioned as a federal union until 1939/40 when it became a unitary organisation.

International Defence and Aid Fund for Southern Africa

  • C0062
  • Corporate body
  • 1960-1990

The International Defence and Aid Fund for Southern Africa (IDAF) was an anti-apartheid organization that smuggled £100 million into South Africa for the defense of thousands of political activists and to provide aid for their families while they were in prison.

IDAF grew out of Christian Action (CA), an organization set up by John Collins aimed at relating Christianity to economic, social and political life, and that worked towards reconciliation with Germany and help for the starving people of Europe. In 1948 Collins was appointed Canon of St Paul's Cathedral in London. CA raised money raised money for the families and dependents of those sent to prison during the Defiance Campaign. In 1954 John went to South Africa where he saw apartheid and its effects for himself, and met activists and leaders in the liberation movements. In 1956, when 156 activists were arrested and charged with High Treason, Canon Collins sent £100 to Ambrose Reeves, Bishop of Johannesburg, asking him to brief the best available defense lawyers and pledging CA to raise the funds to pay legal expenses and care for the families of the Treason Trialists. Reeves, foreseeing further repression, suggested widening CA's terms of reference and so the British Defence and Aid Fund for Southern Africa (as it was originally called) was born. As repression in South Africa increased, Defence and Aid responded to ever more pressing political and legal defense needs.

The organization grew and began to receive international recognition and support, mainly from the Scandinavian countries and the United Nations. Several countries formed aid committees. IDAF went international in 1965, with branches in Britain, New Zealand, Scandinavia, Holland and India. On March 18, 1966, the then Mister of Justice Johannes Vorster banned the South African Defence and Aid Committee as an 'unlawful organization' under the Suppression of Communism Act but IDAF continued to send aid through secret channels. Over a period of 25 years, £100 million was smuggled into South Africa. The organization also had an extensive research and publication operation. Canon Collins died in 1982 and Horst Kleinschmidt was named Director of IDAF that same year, a position he held until the organization closed.

International Marxist Group

  • C0115
  • Corporate body
  • 1968-1982

The International Marxist Group (IMG) was a Trotskyist group in Britain, the national section of the Fourth International. It was formed in 1968.

The group emerged from the International Group, which had split from the Revolutionary Socialist League (RSL) in 1961 in support of the International Secretariat of the Fourth International (ISFI) over the RSL leadership, which was the ISFI local section. The IMG later superceded the RSL as the national section of the then reunited Fourth International.

The organisation published International throughout its existence. It launched The Black Dwarf publication in 1968, edited by Tariq Ali, which was superceded by Red Mole in 1970.

The IMG dissolved and entered the Labour Party in 1982 as the Socialist League.

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