Showing 219 results

names

Rose, Henry Frances Aylward | b 1928 | Secretary and Treasurer of the Glasgow and West of Scotland College of Domestic Science

  • P0075
  • Person
  • b 1928

Henry Rose (known as Harry) was born on the 22nd of March 1928 and attended Rutherglen Academy from 1940 -1944. In July 1962 he became Chief Clerk of the Technical College, Coatbridge. He studied at the University of Glasgow from October 1965 to June 1968, qualifying with a Diploma in Public Administration. On 1 January 1969 Harry Rose took up the appointment of Senior Administrative Officer for the Glasgow and West of Scotland College of Domestic Science. He was married with a son and two daughters and had experience in general administration; finance; student records and examination arrangements; statistics and liaison work. He was appointed by Miss Calder after a Governor's meeting in June 1968 recognised that this role was needed in order to cater for the administration of the College. When Mr Mackenzie, the Secretary and Treasurer resigned on the 30th of June 1972, Harry Rose was appointed Secretary and Treasurer. With this title he became official correspondent for the College and the registered office of the College became 1 Park Drive. He was the first full-time member of College staff to hold the position of Secretary and Treasurer (previously the role had been carried out by partners of the Glasgow firm of solicitors, Hill and Hoggan). He was also the first man to become a full-time member of the College staff, apart from janitors and boilermen.
Mr Rose was an invaluable member of College staff supporting it through major changes. Juliann Calder’ successor as Principal, Geoffrey Richardson, brought a new style of management to the College as well as changes in organisational structure and staffing. Developments in further and higher education and the introduction of the Council for National Academic Awards (CNAA) also brought new standards and processes to be adhered to.
Harry Rose retired on 31st March 1989. A formal luncheon was held in his honour on 22 March 1989 at which he was presented with a video recorder and cheque.

Hill and Hoggan, Solicitors, Glasgow | early 18th century-1971

  • C0121
  • Corporate body
  • early 18th century-1971

Hill and Hoggan were solicitors in Glasgow from the early eighteenth century. Mr George B Hoggan, who was a Partner in the firm, acted as Secretary to the Glasgow School of Cookery from the time of its commencement in 1874. In 1908, when it amalgamated with the West End School of Cookery, to become the Glasgow and West of Scotland College of Domestic Science (Incorporated), Mr Hoggan became a Governor of the College. From that time there was a succession of four Secretaries of the College, all of them partners in Hill and Hoggan:

Dr James A McCallum (d 1948), Secretary and Treasurer, 1908-1921; Joint Secretary and Treasurer, 1921-1928
Mr Andrew MacNair (d 1933), Joint Secretary and Treasurer, 1921-1928; Secretary and Treasurer, 1928-1933
Mr T L Grahame Reid (d 1969), Secretary and Treasurer, 1933-1969
Mr James D MacKenzie, Secretary and Treasurer, 1969-1972

Dr McCallum did a lot of work to raise the funds to build the new College premises in Park Drive and offered guidance in the move to the new building. He was dedicated to College affairs during his years of office. Due to illness, another partner, Andrew McNair was appointed as Joint Secretary, becoming sole Secretary when Dr McCallum resigned in December 1928. When Andrew McNair died in 1933 he was succeeded by TL Grahame Reid who died in 1969 and was replaced by James D Mackenzie.

Hill & Hoggan combined with the firm Mitchells Johnston and Company on 1 January 1972. The new firm of Mitchell Johnston Hill and Hoggan continued to administer the legal affairs of the College. On 1 January 1985 the firm merged with Mackenzie Roberton and Company to become Mitchells Roberton.

Queen’s College, Glasgow | Academic Council | 1973-1993

  • C0116
  • Corporate body
  • 1973-1993

The Academic Council was constituted according to the terms of the Central Institutions (Scotland) Regulations (1972). The function of the Academic Council related to the overall planning, coordination, development and supervision of the academic work of the College subject to the general control and direction of the Governing Body. The Academic Council met for the first time on 20 February 1973.

Originally membership consisted of: Principal (Chairman of the Council); Vice-Principal; Librarian; Heads and Associate Heads of Departments six members elected from full-time academic staff, four co-opted members including two students (nominated by the Student Representative Council) and another student as an observer. Elected and co-opted members served for four years and were eligible for re-election on expiry of their term of office. Elections took place in January of the year where an election fell, with the first in January 1979.

The Council usually met on a monthly basis during term time with extraordinary meetings being called to deal with particular items of business. The Chairman of the Council, in consultation with the Clerk to the Council, was responsible for drawing up the Agenda for a meeting, ensuring that all competent business was included, and that members were notified. The Chairman also had to verify the accuracy of the minutes, to sign them, and ensure that they were kept.

The Academic Council appointed a number of Standing Committees including:
-Research and Staff Development Committee
-Course Committees
-Course Development, Validating and Monitoring Committee
-Assessment Boards
Some of these committees had the power to set up sub-committees. Each committee was responsible to the Academic Council for its work and the minutes of their meeting were presented to the Academic Council for review.

There were also Advisory Committees which had no executive responsibilities but provided advice to the Academic Council and senior management. The Advisory Committees included:
-Senior Management Advisory Group
-Learning Resources Advisory Committee
-Library Advisory Committee
-Staff/Student Affairs Committee
-Computer Users’ Committee

Following the introduction of the Central Institutions (Scotland) Regulations (1988) the Governing Body was required to set up a new Academic Council to sit from 1 April 1990 to reflect the new academic structure of the College. Membership of the new Academic Council would include: Principal; Vice-Principal; Head of Faculty, Health Studies; Head of Faculty: Management Studies; Chief Librarian; President of SRC; 4 elected teaching members of staff; co-opted members including the chairmen of the 3 major College Committees (Research and Staff Development; Academic and Professional Standards; and Central Services) and one non-teaching member of staff.

The Standing Committees and Advisory Committees also changed at this time to reflect the new academic structure and needs of the College. The standing committees included:
-Two Faculty Boards, of Health Studies and Management Studies (with subcommittees: Course Committees; Assessment Boards; Course Planning Committees; Course Review Committees)
-Academic and Professional Standards Committee (with subcommittees: Validation Panels; Credit Accumulation and Transfer)
-Research and Staff Development Committee (but with Funding Sub-committee and Research Degrees Committee).
The Advisory committees were:
-Appeals Review Committee
-Ethics Committee

Course Development, Validating and Monitoring Committee

The Course Development, Validating and Monitoring Committee (shortened to Course Development Committee in 1982) was responsible for encouraging the development of new courses, examining the feasibility of proposed courses and appointing a Course Planning Committee responsible for developing adopted courses. Each stage of course planning and validation had to be approved by the Committee and it was also responsible for monitoring progress of existing courses.

Membership was as follows: Principal; Vice-Principal; Secretary and Treasurer; Heads and Associate Heads of Departments; Senior Librarian; Senior lecturer, Learning Resources Centre; up to five other members elected from the academic staff, up to four members, with appropriate experience, from outwith the College; one student representative appointed by the Student Representative Council. The Academic Council elected the Chair of the Committee who would serve no longer than three years. Appointed members would serve for not more than two years but could be re-appointed without a break in service. Appointments were made in September unless a vacancy occurred.

Course Planning Committees

The Course Planning Committees were responsible for examining in detail and reporting on the feasibility of the proposed course in terms of likely student demand, employment, development and cultural opportunities and resources required. The committees drafted each stage of submissions for the Scottish Education Department and external validating bodies for approval by the Course Development, Validating and Monitoring Committee.

The membership of each Course Planning Committee was approved by the Course Development, Validating and Monitoring Committee. Expertise from outwith the College could be co-opted to the committee. Each committee would cease to function once the course was finally approved and in operation.

Course Committees

The Course Committees were responsible for advising the Course Leader on the organisation and administration of the course, keeping it under review during the period of approval, to make recommendations for changes in the course scheme and to produce a course handbook for the information of students and staff.

The membership of a Course Committee consisted of the members of the complementary Assessment Board, including the External Assessors, plus two students from each year of the course. The Course Leader, appointed by the Academic Council, would chair the committee, which would meet at least once each term.

Assessment Boards

Members of Assessment Boards for each course were appointed by the Academic Council and approved by the Course Development Committee. They were responsible for ensuring that the course assessment regulations, laid down by the Academic Council, were adhered to. They had to ensure that appropriate arrangements were made for examinations and assessments, review students’ performance and draw up results lists.

Research and Staff Development Committee

The Committee was responsible for reviewing the expertise of staff in light of any changes in the academic work of the college. It would make recommendations regarding staff development to the Academic Council to ensure the skillset would be able to meet future development plans. The committee would arrange appropriate in-service training and create an environment to encourage staff research and development activities. The Committee would advise on the development of research activities that were worthy of support by the College.

Membership was as follows: Principal; Vice-Principal; Secretary and Treasurer; Heads and Associate Heads of Departments; Senior Librarian; Senior Lecturer, Learning Resources Centre; up to five other members elected from the academic staff, up to two members, with appropriate experience, from outwith the College; one student representative appointed by the Student Representative Council. The Academic Council elected the Chair of the Committee who would serve no longer than three years. Appointed members would serve for not more than two years but could be re-appointed without a break in service. Appointments were made in September unless a vacancy occurred.

Senior Management Advisory Group

The Senior Management Advisory Group acted as an informal forum for the discussion of College matters and to advise the Principal.

Membership consisted of: Principal; Vice-Principal; Heads and Associate Heads of Departments; Senior Lecturer, Learning Resources Centre; Senior Librarian; Secretary and Treasurer; and other staff invited to meetings as appropriate.

Staff/ Student Affairs Advisory Committee

The Staff/ Student Affairs Advisory Committee acted as a forum for discussion of matters of interest, including: complaints and queries, reviewing induction procedures, compilation of student welfare guides. Meetings were held at least one per month.

Membership consisted of: 1 staff member from each Course Committee, serving no longer than three years; 1 student member from each Course Committee; President of the Student Representative Council (SRC); two members appointed by the SRC.

Library Advisory Committee

The Library Advisory Committee advised the Senior Librarian on matters of general library policy and operation, including; the selection of publications; implications for the library of new courses and changes in courses.

Membership consisted of: Principal; Vice-Principal; Secretary and Treasurer; Senior Librarian; Assistant Librarians (when appropriate); Senior Lecturer, Learning Resources Centre; one representative of each Head or Associate Head of Department; two students nominated by the Student Representative Council; persons from outwith the College may be co-opted for specific purposes.

Computer Users’ Committee

The Computer Users’ Committee would encourage staff and students to use the computing facilities for teaching, research and administrative purposes. It would make recommendations to the Research and Staff Development Committee on forward plans for staffing equipment and accommodation with estimates and costs and on matters relating to the College computing facilities.

Membership consisted of: Chairman (appointed by the Research and Staff Development Committee); Vice-Principal; two representatives nominated by each Head or Associate Head of Department; Senior Lecturer, Learning Resources Centre; Senior Librarian; two nominees of the Secretary and Treasurer; up to four co-opted members (including at least one student user).

Phillips, John Clifford | b 1943 | Principal of The Queen's College, Glasgow

  • P0072
  • Person
  • b 1943

John Clifford Phillips was born in Dyfed, Wales, on 29 January 1943. He attended Llandeilo Grammar School before studying Mathematics at Aberystwyth University and graduating with a BSc in 1964.

He started his career as an engineering mathematician, later becoming a specialist in systems development. After graduating he carried out research at the Mathematics Department of the University of Glasgow. During this period he met his wife, Anne Margaret and they were married in 1967. That same year he took up a position as lecturer at Lancashire Polytechnic. After 2 years he moved to Leeds Polytechnic where he remained until 1990. Initially employed as lecturer he had a series of promotions, eventually becoming Head of the School of Mathematics and Computing in 1986 and then Dean for the Faculty of Engineering and Computing in 1987. His final post at the Polytechnic, between 1988 and 1990, was as Senior, Executive, External Development. He was responsible for the Polytechnic’s external income generation work and undertook consultancy work in Brunei, Guyana, Tanzania, Hong Kong and China, mainly in training needs analysis and institutional management. After leaving Leeds Polytechnic he worked as a freelance consultant before taking on the role of Principal of The Queen’s College, Glasgow, in February 1991.

His management experience equipped him to lead the College through a difficult period of uncertainty culminating in merger with Glasgow Polytechnic in 1993 to become Glasgow Caledonian University. John Phillips was appointed Vice-Principal of the new University.

Richardson, Geoffrey Alan | b 1936 | Principal of The Queen's College, Glasgow

  • P0071
  • Person
  • b 1936

Geoffrey Alan Richardson was born in Lancashire on 27 July 1936. He graduated with an MA (Hons) in Geography from Fitzwilliam College, Cambridge in 1958. He went on to gain his teaching certificate from Exeter University in 1959, before beginning his career as a geography teacher.

He taught in primary and secondary schools in England and Australia, where he and his wife lived for 3 years. On their return to England he became a senior tutor in Ilkley College of Education, Yorkshire and his career interests developed into education management. He was awarded a diploma in Education Management from Sheffield Polytechnic in 1973. His role at the College included teaching students of environmental studies, home economics, professional studies and teaching practice as well as having overall responsibility for student welfare in the College and for a hall of residence. He was involved in education management developments at the College and began research on a part-time basis at the University of Manchester towards a masters degree in Education. He also wrote several geography textbooks at this time. He was a man of wide interests, he fished, ran 3 miles every morning and had been principal clarinettist in the Cambridge University Orchestra, continuing to play in several music societies.

Geoffrey Richardson took up the position as Principal of the newly named The Queen’s College, Glasgow, on 1 September 1976. He was the first male to take on the role at the College which had been led by women for over a century. He led the College through difficult times, upgrading the academic standards and modernising its organisational structure. He achieved this through a College Development Programme from 1977 to 1986, involving all staff in the process of change. During his time as Principal the College also expanded its syllabus and premises, including the provision of Social Work courses from 1976, the transfer of the physiotherapy schools from Greater Glasgow Health Board to the College in 1977, and the schools of the other allied health professions between 1984 and 1990. The College also achieved CNAA (Council for National Academic Awards) accreditation for its degrees and underwent an HMI (Her Majesty’s Inspectorate) inspection in May 1985. During this time Geoffrey Richardson studied towards a Doctorate in Education which he awarded by the University of Glasgow in 1980.

He resigned from the College, leaving in January 1991 to take up the position of Director of Roffey Park Management College in Sussex.

MacKirdy, Mary | 1874–1957 | Principal of the West End School of Cookery, Glasgow

  • P0067
  • Person
  • 1874–1957

Mary MacKirdy, was the niece of Mrs Margaret Black, founder of the West End School of Cookery. She was born on the 11th May 1874 and achieved her diploma from the West End School in September 1894, with both the Scotch Education Department and the Glasgow School Board granting assessments for her training. She taught cookery at the West End School of Cookery from 1895, becoming its Principal on Margaret Black’s death in 1903.

When the West End School of Cookery amalgamated with the Glasgow School of Cookery in 1908, to form The Glasgow and West of Scotland College of Domestic Science, the Miss Ella Glaister became Principal, however Mary MacKirdy remained as part of the teaching staff. She was a head teacher in cookery, specialising in the Article 55 students, the Provincial Committee students who were supplementing their elementary teaching qualification. She kept abreast of the growing subject of Domestic Science, on the whole, and gave well attended public lectures and worked with Ministry of Labour classes. She was a published writer of articles and books on cookery including the College publication "Recipes for You".

Her younger sister Miss Janet MacKirdy was also on the teaching staff and they both shared a house, first at 191 Renfrew Street, then latterly at 9 Park Quadrant. In June and July of 1926 Mary was granted two months leave of absence to visit the United States and Canada, with a view to furthering her knowledge by visiting schools and colleges in these countries. Janet was also granted one months’ leave, June, to travel with her sister and her remit was labour saving and modern household devices.

Mary MacKirdy was made a Fellow of the Educational Institute of Scotlandin 1935. She resigned from the College on the 9th of September 1937, after 42 years of service. On leaving she wasthe longest serving member of staff. She went on to become a Nutrition Supervisor for the Community Service in Scotland at the age of 63 years. A College prize, in appreciation of her work and service was given in her name for Article 55 students. This was presented by Mrs Black, of Kirkcaldy, who had previously given the Mrs Margaret Black Memorial Prize in 1925. The prize was first presented in 1938.

Mary MacKirdy was very much involved with the Bridgeton's Women's Institution, holding the position of Convener, and devoting much of her time to settlement and club work in Bridgeton. When this organisation ceased to function a gift of £200 from it's remaining funds was gifted to the College in December 1950. This money was used for educational purposes in the field of social sciences and was known as the Bridgeton's Women's Institution Fund.

Mary MacKirdy died in 1957.

Scottish Education Department | 1872-1999

  • C0113
  • Corporate body
  • 1872-1999

The Scottish Education Department (SED) came into being as the body responsible for schooling in Scotland when it was formed from the Church of Scotland's Board of Education for Scotland in 1872.

The Education (Scotland) Act 1872 made education compulsory and took over the running of schools from the Church of Scotland. Burgh as well as parish schools now came under School Boards run by local committees. It was originally called the Scotch Education Department, was a committee of the Privy Council of the United Kingdom, and had its offices in London. In 1885 the department became a responsibility of the new ministerial post of Secretary for Scotland, under whom the Scottish Office was set up in Dover House, Whitehall, London.
In 1918 the department was moved to Edinburgh and the name was changed to the Scottish Education Department, in accordance with Scottish usage. The Secretary for Scotland became the Secretary of State for Scotland in 1926. The department was renamed the Scottish Office Education Department (SOED) in 1991, and the Scottish Office Education and Industry Department (SOEID) in 1995.

With devolution in 1999 the new Scottish Executive set up the Scottish Executive Education Department (SEED) to oversee school education whilst the Scottish Executive Enterprise and Lifelong Learning Department – now Enterprise Transport and Lifelong Learning Department (ETLLD) – took over responsibility from the former SED for further and higher education.

Queen’s College, Glasgow | Research and Staff Development Committee |1980-1993

  • C0119
  • Corporate body
  • 1980-1993

The Research and Staff Development Committee was set up as a Standing Committee by the Academic Council in 1980. it was responsible for reviewing the expertise of staff in light of any changes in the academic work of the college. It would make recommendations regarding staff development to the Academic Council to ensure the skillset would be able to meet future development plans. The committee would arrange appropriate in-service training and create an environment to encourage staff research and development activities. The Committee would advise on the development of research activities that were worthy of support by the College.

Membership was as follows: Principal; Vice-Principal; Secretary and Treasurer; Heads and Associate Heads of Departments; Senior Librarian; Senior Lecturer, Learning Resources Centre; up to five other members elected from the academic staff, up to two members, with appropriate experience, from outwith the College; one student representative appointed by the Student Representative Council. The Academic Council elected the Chair of the Committee who would serve no longer than three years. Appointed members would serve for not more than two years but could be re-appointed without a break in service. Appointments were made in September unless a vacancy occurred.

Queen’s College, Glasgow | Academic and Professional Standards Committee | 1990-1993

  • C0120
  • Corporate body
  • 1990-1993

The Academic and Professional Standards Committee was formed following the introduction of the Central Institutions (Scotland) Regulations (1988) the Governing Body when the academic structure of the College was re-organised into faculties. It was responsible for the maintenance and enhancement of academic standards on courses being offered by the College and examining the feasibility of proposals for new courses in terms of academic content, physical resources and staffing. It oversaw the work of the Validation Panels and Credit Accumulation and Transfer Sub-committee and was responsible for monitoring the appointment of external assessors by the Faculties.
Membership included Principal; Vice-Principal; Deans of Faculty; Head of Quality Assurance Unit; 4 Course Leaders (2 nominated by each faculty); 4 Teaching staff (2 elected from each faculty); 1 representative of the Academic Council; 2 Student members appointed by the Student Representative Council; co-opted members as required.

Queen’s College, Glasgow | Central Academic Services Committee | 1983-1991

  • C0118
  • Corporate body
  • 1983-1991

The Central Academic Services Committee was set up by the Academic Council in September 1982, mainly as a response to comments made in the Institutional Review Report. It's role was to advise the Academic Council on policy issues related to the development of the Library, Learning Resources Centre, Computer Centre, non specialist teaching rooms and the Student Advisory Centre. It oversaw the work of the sub-committees and working groups relating to the services serving the academic sectors of the College.

It's members included the Principal; Vice-principal; Secretary and Treasurer; Director, Computer Centre; Senior Lecturer, Learning Resources Centre; Chief Librarian; Student Counsellor; four elected members of the academic staff; two representatives of the technical and administrative staff; two student members.

The sub-committees included:
-Library sub-committee
-Learning Resources sub-committee
-Computer Services sub-committee
The first meeting of the Committee was held on 15 February 1983.

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