Showing 219 results

names

Vorster | John | 1915-1983 | Former President of South Africa

  • P0053
  • Person
  • 1915-1983

John Vorster was born December 13, 1915 in Jamestown, South Africa. in 1966, one week after Verwoerd was assassinated, a National Party caucus chose Vorster as his successor. In 1978 he resigned his post for health reasons and on October 10 became his nation's president, a largely ceremonial position. In November the so-called Muldergate scandal came to a boil. In 1979 he resigned the presidency.

War on Want

  • C0068
  • Corporate body
  • 1951 - present

A letter from Victor Gollancz to The Guardian in February 1951 led to the founding of War on Want. His letter asked people to join an international struggle against poverty. Harold Wilson MP coined the name.

War on Want has always been at the forefront of many of the debates on global poverty and injustice. As early as 1961, War on Want raised concerns about 'third world' debt and warned it would be a central issue in the future.

War on Want | Scottish War on Want

  • C0069
  • Corporate body

The Scottish Arm of War on Want.

A letter from Victor Gollancz to The Guardian in February 1951 led to the founding of War on Want. His letter asked people to join an international struggle against poverty. Harold Wilson MP coined the name.

War on Want has always been at the forefront of many of the debates on global poverty and injustice. As early as 1961, War on Want raised concerns about 'third world' debt and warned it would be a central issue in the future.

Weaving | Stuart | fl. 1968-present | Businessman

  • P0058
  • Person
  • fl. 1968-present

Stuart Weaving a UK businessman founded the Weaving International Friendship Foundation in 1968. It embraces the Friends of the Springbok and Friends of the Lion and helps reunite families and friends in the United Kingdom, South Africa, Australia, New Zealand and North America.

Webb, Angela | anti-apartheid activist

  • P0048
  • Person

Webb co-managed the South African musician Marah Louw's fundraising tour of the UK in 1994 with Kevin Buchanan. Louw visited the cities which had given Mandela their Freedom, as well as Edinburgh and Liverpool. The tour was a fundraising effort for the ANC's electoral campaign.

West End School of Cookery | 1878-1908

  • C0112
  • Corporate body
  • 1878-1908

The West End School of Cookery, Glasgow, Scotland, was founded in 1878 and opened to the public on 29 October of that year. In 1908, the School amalgamated with the Glasgow School of Cookery to form a Scottish central institution under the title the Glasgow and West of Scotland College of Domestic Science (Incorporated), later named The Queen’s College, Glasgow.

The founder of the West End School of Cookery was Margaret Black (1830-1903), who had been a teacher at the Glasgow School of Cookery and left in 1878 to open her own school. When Margaret Black died in March 1903 she was succeeded as Principal by her niece, Mary McKirdy (1874-1957).

The School’s first premises were in the Corporation Galleries at 2 Dalhousie Street, Glasgow. Initially the School provided private classes in cookery and although it had been running classes in Glasgow and Govan Board Schools, it was not until 1885 that the Scotch Education Department recognised it as a teacher training centre. In September 1903 the school moved to larger premises at 346 Sauchiehall Street, Glasgow, and also at 1 Scott Street, Glasgow. The subjects taught at the School were extended and by 1905 teachers’ diploma courses were being offered in cookery, housewifery and laundry, along with certificates to housewives, housekeepers and cooks. Prior to amalgamation in 1908 the School was known as the West End Training School of Cookery and employed 5 teachers.

World Council on Churches

  • C0031
  • Corporate body
  • 1948 - present

The WCC brings together churches, denominations and church fellowships in more than 110 countries and territories throughout the world, representing over 500 million Christians and including most of the world's Orthodox churches, scores of Anglican, Baptist, Lutheran, Methodist and Reformed churches, as well as many United and Independent churches. While the bulk of the WCC's founding churches were European and North American, today most member churches are in Africa, Asia, the Caribbean, Latin America, the Middle East and the Pacific. There are now 348 member churches.

For its member churches, the WCC is a unique space: one in which they can reflect, speak, act, worship and work together, challenge and support each other, share and debate with each other.

de Klerk | Fredrik Willem | b.1936 | Former President of South Africa

  • P0055
  • Person
  • b. 1936

F. W. de Klerk was born in Johannesburg on 18 March 1936. F.W. de Klerk grew up in a political family, with both his father and grandfather serving high office. His father, Jan de Klerk, was a Cabinet Minister and the President of the South African Senate. In this political environment he learned the essential importance of timing. His brother is Dr Willem (Wimpie) de Klerk, a political analyst and one of the founders of the Democratic Party.

After finishing school in Krugersdorp, F.W. de Klerk graduated in 1958 from Potchefstroom University with BA and Ll.B degrees (the latter cum laude). At the same time he was awarded the Abe Bailey scholarship (an all-expenses paid educational tour to the United Kingdom). In 1969 he married Marike Willemse, with whom he had two sons and a daughter.

From 1961-1972 de Klerk practiced as an attorney in Vereeniging. During this time, he played an active part in Nationalist Party politics and in local educational affairs. He was offered the chair of Administrative Law at Potchefstroom University, but declined the position when he was elected Member of Parliament for Vereeniging in November 1972.

In 1975 he became information officer of the Transvaal National Party. He held several ministerial positions in the Cabinet of President P.W. Botha, including Minister of Post and Telecommunications and Sport and Recreation (1978-1979); Mines, Energy and Environmental Planning (1979-1980); Mineral and Energy Affairs (1980-1982); Internal Affairs (1982-1985); and National Education and Planning (1984-1989). In 1982 he became the Transvaal leader of the National Party after Dr Andries Treurnicht quit the party. In 1985 he was appointed chairman of the Ministers’ Council in the House of Assembly and in 1986 he became the House’s leader. When P.W. Botha resigned as leader of the National Party in February 1989, he was succeeded by de Klerk. In September he was elected the new State President. He soon announced his policy of reform: he hoped to create a suitable climate for negotiations which would end apartheid and bring about a new Constitutional dispensation for South Africa, based on the principle of one person, one vote.

In December 1989, de Klerk met with the imprisoned leader of the African National Congress (ANC), Nelson Mandela. On 2 February 1990, de Klerk lifted the ban on the ANC, the South African Communist Party (SACP) and the Pan Africanist Congress (PAC). On 11 February Mandela was released. Negotiations with Mandela and other party leaders were held for the peaceful end of apartheid and transition to democratic rule. In 1993, De Klerk and Mandela were awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for their efforts at reform in South Africa.

After 1994. After the 1994 elections, De Klerk was appointed the Second Vice President in President Mandela’s cabinet. In 1996 and other National Party members withdrew from their cabinet posts in order to establish the National Party as an effective opposition to the ANC. In 1997 De Klerk retired from politics.

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