Showing 219 results

names

Aberdeen University Press

  • C0050
  • Corporate body
  • 1900-1996

Aberdeen University Press was first incorporated in 1900 but the printers from which it was formed had been producing books and journals for Aberdeen’s two universities – King’s College and Marischal College – for twenty-five years before their amalgamation in 1865. The Press’s initial reputation was for the production of high quality books requiring specialist skills.
The company existed in this form until it became defunct in 1996 and was then relaunched in 2013.

African National Congress

  • C0049
  • Corporate body
  • 1912 - present

The African National Congress (ANC) is South Africa's governing party and has been in power since the transition to democracy in April 1994. The organisation was initially founded as the South African Native National Congress (SANNC) on 8 January 1912 in Bloemfontein, with the aim of fighting for the rights of black South Africans.

The organization was renamed the ANC in 1923. While the organization’s early period was characterized by political inertia due to power struggles and lack of resources, increasing repression and the entrenchment of white minority rule galvanized the party. As a result of the establishment of apartheid, its aversion to dissent by Black people and brutal crackdown of political activists, the ANC together with the SACP formed a military wing, uMkhonto we Sizwe (Spear of the Nation/ MK) in 1961.

Through MK, the ANC waged the armed struggle and obtained support from some African countries and the Soviet block for its activities. With the increasing internal dissent, international pressure and the collapse of the Soviet Union, the apartheid government was forced to enter into negotiations with the ANC. This saw the collapse of apartheid and the ushering in of democratic rule in 1994.

African National Congress Women's League

  • C0110
  • Corporate body
  • 1931-

The African National Congress (ANC) when it was formed in 1912, did not accept women as members. There was no broad women's organisation during the first decades of the ANCs existence. In 1931 the Bantu Womens League (BWL) was recognised as the women`s branch of the ANC. Its first president was Charlotte Maxeke. The BWL was mostly involved in passive resistance and concentrated on the fight against passes for black women. In 1943 women were formally admitted as ANC members. The ANC Women's League was formed in 1948.

Amnesty International

  • C0084
  • Corporate body
  • 1961- present

Amnesty International is a human rights charity that has grown from seeking the release of political prisoners to upholding the whole spectrum of human rights. Their work protects and empowers people - from abolishing the death penalty to protecting sexual and reproductive rights, and from combatting discrimination to defending refugees and migrants’ rights. We speak out for anyone and everyone whose freedom and dignity are under threat.

Anarpeace

  • C0016
  • Corporate body
  • c.1976-1994

An organisation which supported the work of the Campaign for Nuclear Disarmament and the Anti-Apartheid Movement It publishing a monthly newsletter and was based in Glasgow.

Anderson, Colin

  • P0023
  • Person

Anderson acted as the Glasgow Group/Committee chair to the Scottish Committee of the Anti-Apartheid Movement.

Andross, Mary | 1893-1968 |Teacher and Head of Science Department, Glasgow and West of Scotland College of Domestic Science

  • P0074
  • Person
  • 1893 – 1968

Mary Andross (known as Maryann ) was born on the 17th of March 1895 in Irvine, Ayrshire. She graduated with a BSc from Glasgow University in 1916 and thereafter undertook post graduate work with Professor George G Henderson, firstly at the Technical College (now Strathclyde University), and then at the University of Glasgow. During World War I she worked as a day teacher at Irvine Royal Academy, 1916-1917, and then at the Ministry of Munitions Inspections Department on poison gases, 1917-1919. From 1919 to 1923 she worked as a Chemistry Assistant at the University of Glasgow.
Mary Andross was appointed as lecturer in the Science Department of the Glasgow and West of Scotland College of Domestic Science on 1 September 1924, becoming Head of the Department in 1933. There she pioneered courses for the training of dieticians and made many original contributions to developing knowledge of the chemical composition of food. By 1936 a new diet kitchen and research laboratory for dieticians was added to the College. This facilitated her opportunity for research. In particular, she applied analytical procedures to determine the effect of cooking on the nutrients in every day foodstuffs. In this field her most notable contributions were to the study of changes in food proteins, especially during the cooking of meat and of eggs. She was an inspiring and able lecturer and was not only popular with her students but was much sought after as a public speaker, particularly in the Women’s Rural Institute and Women’s Guild meetings.
She gained the respect of chemists and food scientists. In 1951 she became a Fellow of the Royal Institute of Chemistry and in 1964 a Fellow of the Institute of Food Science and Technology. She was also a member of the Nutrition Society and of the Society of Chemical Industry, and served on the committees of both.
During World War II she excelled in three major areas of work. She carried out research on sources of vitamin C, especially in work with rosehips, and in producing cost effective nutritious menus to make rations go further. She was one of the leading organisers and active participants in the canteen for servicemen, which was run by the College in St Enoch Station and in providing the backup service of the mobile canteen. She played a leading role in the College’s canning, bottling and pickling service in 1940, and headed a team of staff members who used their vacations to offer this important service to rural areas and districts around Scotland.
She also contributed to the social life of the College, helping to organise events, being involved in sporting activities and becoming President of the College Former Students’ Association. She loved the outdoors and her hobbies were fishing and the history and customs of Scotland, especially the Ayrshire and the West Highlands. She also loved visiting the island of Harris which became almost like her second home.
Mary Andross retired from the College in June 1965 and died in her native Ayrshire in February 1968.

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