Showing 79 results

names
Person

Esack, Farid | b. 1959 | Muslim scholar

  • P0051
  • Person
  • 1959

Dr Farid Esack has an international reputation as a Muslim scholar, speaker and human rights activist. He has lectured widely on religion and Islamic studies and also served as a Commissioner for Gender Equality with Nelson Mandela's government. He has authored numerous Islamic books and is currently the Visiting Professor of Islamic Studies at Harvard Divinity School.

Weaving | Stuart | fl. 1968-present | Businessman

  • P0058
  • Person
  • fl. 1968-present

Stuart Weaving a UK businessman founded the Weaving International Friendship Foundation in 1968. It embraces the Friends of the Springbok and Friends of the Lion and helps reunite families and friends in the United Kingdom, South Africa, Australia, New Zealand and North America.

Budd | Zola | b.1966 | Athlete

  • P0056
  • Person
  • b. 1966

Zola Budd was born on 26 May 1966 in Bloemfontein, Free State, South Africa. Budd burst into national prominence in 1983. In 1984 she gained international recognition when, at the age of 17, she broke the women's 5000m world record. As this performance took place in apartheid South Africa, the world track and field establishment refused to recognise the record. However, she was later to claim the world record officially, while representing Great Britain in 1985, clocking 14:48.07.

Despite being a world class athlete she could not compete in the 1984 Olympic games as South Africa had been banned from competing before the start of the Tokyo Olympic games in 1964. In 1984, Budd was granted a British passport and participated in the British team in the Los Angeles Olympic Games in that year. In the final of the 3,000m race, Budd and Mary Decker, the American favourite to win, accidentally collided. Budd eventually finished seventh, while Decker was carried from the track side. Although the International Amateur Athletics Federation (IAAF) jury found that Budd was not responsible for the collision, she was booed by the crowd who favoured Decker.

In a low key event in Crystal Palace, England, Budd on 26 August 1985 broke the 5 000m world record set by Ingrid Kristiansens of Norway sixteen years previously by more than ten seconds to set a new mark of 15 minutes 1.83 seconds. Budd stunned the sporting fraternity by running bare footed on her way to claim this magnificent feat. As South Africa was banned from competing in any sporting code with other countries, the event took place without publicity that might have attracted anti-apartheid demonstrators.

Budd returned to South Africa after she was banned by the IAAF in 1988 because she allegedly took part in an event in this country, though she insisted that she only attended the event and did not run. She retired from international competition for several years, but began racing again in South Africa and had an excellent season in 1991, when she was the second fastest woman in the world over 3,000m.

Budd is married to Mike Pieterse, a South African businessman and has three children. She still runs 16 – 24 km a day.

de Klerk | Fredrik Willem | b.1936 | Former President of South Africa

  • P0055
  • Person
  • b. 1936

F. W. de Klerk was born in Johannesburg on 18 March 1936. F.W. de Klerk grew up in a political family, with both his father and grandfather serving high office. His father, Jan de Klerk, was a Cabinet Minister and the President of the South African Senate. In this political environment he learned the essential importance of timing. His brother is Dr Willem (Wimpie) de Klerk, a political analyst and one of the founders of the Democratic Party.

After finishing school in Krugersdorp, F.W. de Klerk graduated in 1958 from Potchefstroom University with BA and Ll.B degrees (the latter cum laude). At the same time he was awarded the Abe Bailey scholarship (an all-expenses paid educational tour to the United Kingdom). In 1969 he married Marike Willemse, with whom he had two sons and a daughter.

From 1961-1972 de Klerk practiced as an attorney in Vereeniging. During this time, he played an active part in Nationalist Party politics and in local educational affairs. He was offered the chair of Administrative Law at Potchefstroom University, but declined the position when he was elected Member of Parliament for Vereeniging in November 1972.

In 1975 he became information officer of the Transvaal National Party. He held several ministerial positions in the Cabinet of President P.W. Botha, including Minister of Post and Telecommunications and Sport and Recreation (1978-1979); Mines, Energy and Environmental Planning (1979-1980); Mineral and Energy Affairs (1980-1982); Internal Affairs (1982-1985); and National Education and Planning (1984-1989). In 1982 he became the Transvaal leader of the National Party after Dr Andries Treurnicht quit the party. In 1985 he was appointed chairman of the Ministers’ Council in the House of Assembly and in 1986 he became the House’s leader. When P.W. Botha resigned as leader of the National Party in February 1989, he was succeeded by de Klerk. In September he was elected the new State President. He soon announced his policy of reform: he hoped to create a suitable climate for negotiations which would end apartheid and bring about a new Constitutional dispensation for South Africa, based on the principle of one person, one vote.

In December 1989, de Klerk met with the imprisoned leader of the African National Congress (ANC), Nelson Mandela. On 2 February 1990, de Klerk lifted the ban on the ANC, the South African Communist Party (SACP) and the Pan Africanist Congress (PAC). On 11 February Mandela was released. Negotiations with Mandela and other party leaders were held for the peaceful end of apartheid and transition to democratic rule. In 1993, De Klerk and Mandela were awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for their efforts at reform in South Africa.

After 1994. After the 1994 elections, De Klerk was appointed the Second Vice President in President Mandela’s cabinet. In 1996 and other National Party members withdrew from their cabinet posts in order to establish the National Party as an effective opposition to the ANC. In 1997 De Klerk retired from politics.

Botha | Pieter Willem | 1916-2006 | Former President of South Africa

  • P0054
  • Person
  • 1916-2006

Born on January 12, 1916, in Paul Roux, South Africa, P.W. Botha rose to prominence in the right-wing National Party, which instituted the strict racial segregation system of apartheid. Botha became the country's prime minister in 1978 and authorized deadly force against anti-apartheid agitators, including members of the ANC. He stepped down from power in 1989. He died on October 31, 2006.

Vorster | John | 1915-1983 | Former President of South Africa

  • P0053
  • Person
  • 1915-1983

John Vorster was born December 13, 1915 in Jamestown, South Africa. in 1966, one week after Verwoerd was assassinated, a National Party caucus chose Vorster as his successor. In 1978 he resigned his post for health reasons and on October 10 became his nation's president, a largely ceremonial position. In November the so-called Muldergate scandal came to a boil. In 1979 he resigned the presidency.

Minty | Abdul | b.1933 | Anti-apartheid activist

  • P0059
  • Person
  • b.1933

On 31 October 1933, Abdul Samad Minty was born in Hartebeesfontein, Northern Transvaal (now known as Limpopo Province). In June 1958 he left for Britain to further his studies. In 1969, eleven years later, he graduated with an MSc in Economics and International Relations at the University College in London. While Minty was abroad he worked for the International Defence and Aid Fund for Southern Africa. Between 1962 and 1995 he was the Honorary Secretary of the British Anti-Apartheid Movement. Minty played an important role in lobbying the International Olympic Committee in 1963 for the suspension of the South African Olympic Committee from the Olympics. In 1969 he published his study on the defence strategy of the apartheid government in South Africa. His publication helped the Anti-Apartheid Movement to develop a campaign for termination of the Simonstown Agreement between South Africa and Britain on the defence of the seas around Southern Africa.

After the fall of apartheid in 1994, Minty was appointed as the Deputy Director-General for Multilateral Affairs in the Department of Foreign Affairs, a position he held till 2004. He also oversaw South Africa's new membership of the Non-Aligned Movement (NAM) and the Commonwealth. On 12 September 2008 South Africa nominated Minty for the post of Director-General of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and his nomination was endorsed by the African Union. Minty also served as a member of Troika Group until May 2009.

Heath | Sir Edward |1916-2005 | Former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom

  • P0060
  • Person
  • 1916-2005

Heath was British Conservative prime minister from 1970 to 1974, a troubled period which came to be seen as reflecting the failure of post-war consensual Conservatism, and produced a backlash in his party that brought Margaret Thatcher to the leadership in 1975.

As prime minister, Heath's policies seemed muddled. His only clear success was in fulfilling his long-held ambition of taking Britain into the European Community, in 1973. He preserved the consensual and moderate policies of his 1950s predecessors, but he also felt obliged to restrain public expenditure through deflationary policies, and to tackle increasing labour unrest by trying to reduce the power of trade unions. When faced with the muscle of the militant miners' union, however, Heath backed down, executing a 'u-turn' for which the Conservative Party's right wing never forgave him. Mass strikes continued, in parallel with ongoing violence in Northern Ireland. The 1974 General Election was inconclusive and Heath resigned as prime minister, to be replaced by Harold Wilson and a minority Labour government. The following year Thatcher replaced Heath as Conservative leader.

Heath remained in parliament until 2001, a constant reminder to Thatcher of the party's moderate and Europhile traditions, which Heath angrily believed she had betrayed. He died on 17 July 2005.

Thatcher|Margaret| 1925-2013 |Former Prime Minister of the United Kingdom

  • P0061
  • Person
  • 1925-2013

Born on October 13, 1925, in Grantham, England, Margaret Thatcher became Britain's Conservative Party leader and in 1979 was elected prime minister, the first woman to hold the position. During her three terms, she cut social welfare programs, reduced trade union power and privatized certain industries. She also opposed international calls to introduce sanctions against the apartheid regime in South Africa and fought a bitter battle with campaigners in Britain. Thatcher resigned in 1991 due to unpopular policy and power struggles in her party. She died on April 8, 2013, at age 87.

Anderson, Colin

  • P0023
  • Person

Anderson acted as the Glasgow Group/Committee chair to the Scottish Committee of the Anti-Apartheid Movement.

Results 1 to 10 of 79