Showing 276 results

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Ecumenical Press Service

  • C0032
  • Corporate body
  • Established 1947

Published weekly under auspices: World Council of Churches; World Alliance of Young Men's Christian Associations; World Young Women's Christian Association; World Student Christian Federation; World Council of Christian Education.

The aim of the EPS was to keep its readers informed of trends of thought and opinion in and about the churches and Christian movements.

The Church of Scotland

  • C0091
  • Corporate body
  • 1560-present

The Church of Scotland is one of the largest organisations in the country. They have over 350,000 members, with more regularly involved in local congregations and our work. Within the organisation,they have around 800 ministers serving in parishes and chaplaincies, supported by more than 1500 professional and administrative staff. Most of the parishes are in Scotland, but there are also churches in England, Europe and overseas.

Esack, Farid | b. 1959 | Muslim scholar

  • P0051
  • Person
  • 1959

Dr Farid Esack has an international reputation as a Muslim scholar, speaker and human rights activist. He has lectured widely on religion and Islamic studies and also served as a Commissioner for Gender Equality with Nelson Mandela's government. He has authored numerous Islamic books and is currently the Visiting Professor of Islamic Studies at Harvard Divinity School.

Catholic International Cooperation for Development and Solidarity

  • C0037
  • Corporate body
  • 1962 - present

CIDSE was officially registered as a non-profit organisation under Belgian law in 1967. However, Catholic charities had already been meeting since 1964 with the intention of creating an ‘international working group for socio-economic development’. CIDSE was founded to coordinate tasks identified by the Second Vatican Council as important tasks for the Catholic Church, namely, to care for the poor and the oppressed and to work for more justice on a global level.

Weaving | Stuart | fl. 1968-present | Businessman

  • P0058
  • Person
  • fl. 1968-present

Stuart Weaving a UK businessman founded the Weaving International Friendship Foundation in 1968. It embraces the Friends of the Springbok and Friends of the Lion and helps reunite families and friends in the United Kingdom, South Africa, Australia, New Zealand and North America.

Budd | Zola | b.1966 | Athlete

  • P0056
  • Person
  • b. 1966

Zola Budd was born on 26 May 1966 in Bloemfontein, Free State, South Africa. Budd burst into national prominence in 1983. In 1984 she gained international recognition when, at the age of 17, she broke the women's 5000m world record. As this performance took place in apartheid South Africa, the world track and field establishment refused to recognise the record. However, she was later to claim the world record officially, while representing Great Britain in 1985, clocking 14:48.07.

Despite being a world class athlete she could not compete in the 1984 Olympic games as South Africa had been banned from competing before the start of the Tokyo Olympic games in 1964. In 1984, Budd was granted a British passport and participated in the British team in the Los Angeles Olympic Games in that year. In the final of the 3,000m race, Budd and Mary Decker, the American favourite to win, accidentally collided. Budd eventually finished seventh, while Decker was carried from the track side. Although the International Amateur Athletics Federation (IAAF) jury found that Budd was not responsible for the collision, she was booed by the crowd who favoured Decker.

In a low key event in Crystal Palace, England, Budd on 26 August 1985 broke the 5 000m world record set by Ingrid Kristiansens of Norway sixteen years previously by more than ten seconds to set a new mark of 15 minutes 1.83 seconds. Budd stunned the sporting fraternity by running bare footed on her way to claim this magnificent feat. As South Africa was banned from competing in any sporting code with other countries, the event took place without publicity that might have attracted anti-apartheid demonstrators.

Budd returned to South Africa after she was banned by the IAAF in 1988 because she allegedly took part in an event in this country, though she insisted that she only attended the event and did not run. She retired from international competition for several years, but began racing again in South Africa and had an excellent season in 1991, when she was the second fastest woman in the world over 3,000m.

Budd is married to Mike Pieterse, a South African businessman and has three children. She still runs 16 – 24 km a day.

de Klerk | Fredrik Willem | b.1936 | Former President of South Africa

  • P0055
  • Person
  • b. 1936

F. W. de Klerk was born in Johannesburg on 18 March 1936. F.W. de Klerk grew up in a political family, with both his father and grandfather serving high office. His father, Jan de Klerk, was a Cabinet Minister and the President of the South African Senate. In this political environment he learned the essential importance of timing. His brother is Dr Willem (Wimpie) de Klerk, a political analyst and one of the founders of the Democratic Party.

After finishing school in Krugersdorp, F.W. de Klerk graduated in 1958 from Potchefstroom University with BA and Ll.B degrees (the latter cum laude). At the same time he was awarded the Abe Bailey scholarship (an all-expenses paid educational tour to the United Kingdom). In 1969 he married Marike Willemse, with whom he had two sons and a daughter.

From 1961-1972 de Klerk practiced as an attorney in Vereeniging. During this time, he played an active part in Nationalist Party politics and in local educational affairs. He was offered the chair of Administrative Law at Potchefstroom University, but declined the position when he was elected Member of Parliament for Vereeniging in November 1972.

In 1975 he became information officer of the Transvaal National Party. He held several ministerial positions in the Cabinet of President P.W. Botha, including Minister of Post and Telecommunications and Sport and Recreation (1978-1979); Mines, Energy and Environmental Planning (1979-1980); Mineral and Energy Affairs (1980-1982); Internal Affairs (1982-1985); and National Education and Planning (1984-1989). In 1982 he became the Transvaal leader of the National Party after Dr Andries Treurnicht quit the party. In 1985 he was appointed chairman of the Ministers’ Council in the House of Assembly and in 1986 he became the House’s leader. When P.W. Botha resigned as leader of the National Party in February 1989, he was succeeded by de Klerk. In September he was elected the new State President. He soon announced his policy of reform: he hoped to create a suitable climate for negotiations which would end apartheid and bring about a new Constitutional dispensation for South Africa, based on the principle of one person, one vote.

In December 1989, de Klerk met with the imprisoned leader of the African National Congress (ANC), Nelson Mandela. On 2 February 1990, de Klerk lifted the ban on the ANC, the South African Communist Party (SACP) and the Pan Africanist Congress (PAC). On 11 February Mandela was released. Negotiations with Mandela and other party leaders were held for the peaceful end of apartheid and transition to democratic rule. In 1993, De Klerk and Mandela were awarded the Nobel Peace Prize for their efforts at reform in South Africa.

After 1994. After the 1994 elections, De Klerk was appointed the Second Vice President in President Mandela’s cabinet. In 1996 and other National Party members withdrew from their cabinet posts in order to establish the National Party as an effective opposition to the ANC. In 1997 De Klerk retired from politics.

Botha | Pieter Willem | 1916-2006 | Former President of South Africa

  • P0054
  • Person
  • 1916-2006

Born on January 12, 1916, in Paul Roux, South Africa, P.W. Botha rose to prominence in the right-wing National Party, which instituted the strict racial segregation system of apartheid. Botha became the country's prime minister in 1978 and authorized deadly force against anti-apartheid agitators, including members of the ANC. He stepped down from power in 1989. He died on October 31, 2006.

Vorster | John | 1915-1983 | Former President of South Africa

  • P0053
  • Person
  • 1915-1983

John Vorster was born December 13, 1915 in Jamestown, South Africa. in 1966, one week after Verwoerd was assassinated, a National Party caucus chose Vorster as his successor. In 1978 he resigned his post for health reasons and on October 10 became his nation's president, a largely ceremonial position. In November the so-called Muldergate scandal came to a boil. In 1979 he resigned the presidency.

British and Irish Lions

  • C0094
  • Corporate body
  • 1888-present

British and Irish Lions is a rugby union team selected from players eligible for any of the Home Unions the national sides of England, Ireland, Scotland and Wales. The Lions are a Test side, and generally select international players, but they can pick uncapped players available to any one of the four unions. The side tours every four years, with these rotating among Australia, New Zealand, and South Africa. The 2009 Test series was lost 2–1 to South Africa, while the 2013 Test series was won 2–1 over Australia.

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