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Governors and appointed committees' meeting minutes : annual published minutes bound in volumes

This sub-series consists of 7 files:

  • Governors and appointed committee meeting minutes, 1907-1909
  • Governors and appointed committee meeting minutes, 1909-1917
  • Governors and appointed committee meeting minutes, 1917-1923
  • Governors and appointed committee meeting minutes, 1923-1934
  • Governors and appointed committee meeting minutes, 1935-1940
  • Governors and appointed committee meeting minutes, 1940-1950
  • Governors and appointed committee meeting minutes, 1950-1964

The minutes of all committees for the year were printed and bound together for the annual general meeting. These are copies of these minutes which have been bound into volumes. Loose copies of individual minutes for 1964 -1993 can be found in QC/1/2/3. To consult just AGM papers, loose copies of the reports of the Governors' to the AGM for 1917 -1991, and AGM minutes for 1973-1991 can be found in QC/1/1/2.

Social Work course proposals

This sub-series consists of 5 files:

  • Three year course for Mature Entrants with Family Commitments submissions, 1976-1991
  • Postgraduate Social Work courses submissions, 1976-1981
  • Postgraduate Social Science course proposal correspondence, 1980
  • Levelling Studies course proposal correspondence, 1981-1983
  • West of Scotland Consortium for Education and Training in Social Work submission, 1989-1990

Eighth International Congress on Home Economics, Edinburgh, Scotland

This sub-series consists of 4 files:

  • Conference papers for the eighth International Congress, 1953
  • Isobel Gibson’s conference pack for the eighth International Congress, 1953
  • Glasgow and West of Scotland College of Domestic Science arrangements for conference delegates visiting the College, 1953
  • Press cuttings about the eighth International Congress, August 1953

The eighth International Congress on Home Economics was held at the University of Edinburgh from 12-18 August 1953. The programme included a visit to the Glasgow and West of Scotland College of Domestic Science. Isobel Gibson was one of the Convenors of Sub-Committees of the organising committee.

Industrial Common Ownership initiatives (ICOM and ICOF) and Scottish Co-operative Development Committee (SCDC) operational papers

This sub-series consists of 9 files:

  • ICOM, ICOF and SCDC operational papers, November 1976 to March 1977
  • ICOM, ICOF and SCDC operational papers, March 1977 to October 1977
  • ICOM, ICOF and SCDC operational papers, October 1977 to June 1978
  • ICOM, ICOF and SCDC operational papers, May 1978 to September 1978
  • ICOM, ICOF and SCDC operational papers, October 1978 to March 1979
  • ICOM, ICOF and SCDC operational papers, April 1979 to October 1979
  • ICOM, ICOF and SCDC operational papers, November 1979- November 1980
  • ICOM, ICOF and SCDC operational papers, November 1980- December 1981
  • ICOM, ICOF and SCDC operational papers, January 1982- May 1988

These papers include agendas and minutes, reports and correspondence relating to the operations of the Industrial Common Ownership Movement (ICOM), Industrial Common Ownership Finance (ICOF), and Scottish Co-operative Development Committee (SCDC).

Industrial Common Ownership Movement (ICOM)
Established in 1971, ICOM promoted co-operative working during a ‘new wave’ of producer co-ops in the 1970s. In 1976 ICOM published a set of Model Rules to enable enterprises to adopt a common ownership legal structure, quickly and inexpensively. There was an amendment of these rules in February 1977 when ICOM was given official recognition as a relevant body within the meaning of Section 1(5) of the ICO Act 1976, providing them with a grant of £20,000 per year for 5 years, to assist in providing advice about all aspects of the setting up of common ownership and co-operative enterprises. The ICOM model rules were simple enough for enterprises to follow without having to employ a lawyer to write a constitution or interpret legal jargon. It merged with the Co-operative Union in 2001 to form Co-operatives UK.

Industrial Common Ownership Finance (ICOF)
ICOF was established by ICOM in 1973 to be a revolving loan fund. It was formed as a company limited by guarantee and without shares; it was administered by Trustees who were appointed by the Members. Members were people who expressed an interest in the financing of common ownership enterprise and had been accepted by the Council of ICOM and by the ICOF Trustees. From 1976 people from the Co-operative movement and the Trade Union movement were invited to join the Trustees. In January 1977 ICOF was formally recognised by the Secretary of State for Industry as a ‘relevant body’ with access to the loan fund of £250,000 provided under section 1(2) of the Industrial Common Ownership Act 1976 to encourage the creation and development of common ownership enterprise and industrial co-operatives. This source of funding lasted until 1981; no further funds were made available from national Government. Successful common ownership enterprises and sympathetic individuals also provided funds to ICOF. From 1981 the bank of England informed ICOF that it was illegal for them to receive deposits for on-lending as they were not licenced as a deposit-taking institution. Seeking alternative means of generating funds they began to work with local authorities (West Midlands County Council, Grater London Council). Since 2005 ICOF has traded as Co-operative and Community Finance.

Scottish Co-operative Development Committee (SCDC)
SCDC was formed in February 1977. In June 1977 it was recognised by Government as an official advisory agency for co-operatives under the Industrial Common Ownership Act 1976. It received funds from Industrial Common Ownership Finance, the ‘designated body’ under the Act. The SCDC was set up to encourage the growth of workers’ co-operatives in Scotland and to promote the growth of a co-operative sector in the economy. Its objectives were to foster the growth of workers’ co-operative enterprises in Scotland in the belief that for workers to own, to control and to shape the organisations in which they work is:
a) a means by which they can more certainly exert an influence over their economic situation, replacing exploitation and conflict by co-operation
b) an extension of the democratic process, by making industry accountable to its workers and sensitive to the wider community
c) a means by which workers can grow as persons, developing their own abilities for the common good.
The organisation now operates as the Co-operative Development Agency

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